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Article: Group G beta-hemolytic Streptococcal bacteremia characterized by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

TitleGroup G beta-hemolytic Streptococcal bacteremia characterized by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2001, v. 39 n. 9, p. 3147-3155 How to Cite?
AbstractLittle is known about the relative importance of the four species of Lancefield group G beta-hemolytic streptococci in causing bacteremia and the factors that determine the outcome for patients with group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia. From 1997 to 2000, 75 group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal strains were isolated from the blood cultures of 66 patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the group G beta-hemolytic streptococci showed that all 75 isolates were Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. The API system (20 STREP) and Vitek system (GPI) successfully identified 65 (98.5%) and 62 (93.9%) isolates, respectively, as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence, whereas the ATB Expression system (ID32 STREP) only successfully identified 49 isolates (74.2%) as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 33 to 99 years). Fifty-six patients (85%) were over 60 years old. All patients had underlying diseases. No source of the bacteremia was identified (primary bacteremia) in 34 patients (52%), whereas 17 (26%) had cellulitis and 8 (12%) had bed sore or wound infections. Fifty-eight patients (88%) had community-acquired group G streptococcal bacteremia. Sixty-two patients (94%) had group G Streptococcus recovered in one blood culture, whereas 4 patients (6%) had it recovered in multiple blood cultures. Fifty-nine patients (89%) had group G Streptococcus as the only bacterium recovered in their blood cultures, whereas in 7 patients other bacteria were recovered concomitantly with the group G Streptococcus in the blood cultures (Staphylococcus aureus in 3, Clostridium perfringens in 2, Citrobacter freundii in 1, and Bacteroides fragilis in 1). Overall, 10 patients (15%) died. Male sex, diagnosis other than cellulitis, hospital-acquired bacteremia, and multiple positive blood cultures were associated with mortality {P < 0.005 (relative risk [RR] = 7.6), P < 0.05 (RR = 3.7), P < 0.005 (RR = 5.6), and P < 0.05 (RR = 5.6), respectively}. Unlike group C beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia, group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia is not a zoonotic infection in Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49222
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, AMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:37:02Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:37:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2001, v. 39 n. 9, p. 3147-3155en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49222-
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about the relative importance of the four species of Lancefield group G beta-hemolytic streptococci in causing bacteremia and the factors that determine the outcome for patients with group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia. From 1997 to 2000, 75 group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal strains were isolated from the blood cultures of 66 patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the group G beta-hemolytic streptococci showed that all 75 isolates were Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. The API system (20 STREP) and Vitek system (GPI) successfully identified 65 (98.5%) and 62 (93.9%) isolates, respectively, as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence, whereas the ATB Expression system (ID32 STREP) only successfully identified 49 isolates (74.2%) as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 33 to 99 years). Fifty-six patients (85%) were over 60 years old. All patients had underlying diseases. No source of the bacteremia was identified (primary bacteremia) in 34 patients (52%), whereas 17 (26%) had cellulitis and 8 (12%) had bed sore or wound infections. Fifty-eight patients (88%) had community-acquired group G streptococcal bacteremia. Sixty-two patients (94%) had group G Streptococcus recovered in one blood culture, whereas 4 patients (6%) had it recovered in multiple blood cultures. Fifty-nine patients (89%) had group G Streptococcus as the only bacterium recovered in their blood cultures, whereas in 7 patients other bacteria were recovered concomitantly with the group G Streptococcus in the blood cultures (Staphylococcus aureus in 3, Clostridium perfringens in 2, Citrobacter freundii in 1, and Bacteroides fragilis in 1). Overall, 10 patients (15%) died. Male sex, diagnosis other than cellulitis, hospital-acquired bacteremia, and multiple positive blood cultures were associated with mortality {P < 0.005 (relative risk [RR] = 7.6), P < 0.05 (RR = 3.7), P < 0.005 (RR = 5.6), and P < 0.05 (RR = 5.6), respectively}. Unlike group C beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia, group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia is not a zoonotic infection in Hong Kong.en_HK
dc.format.extent390 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Microbiology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2001, v. 39 n. 9, p. 3147-3155en_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteremia - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenes, rRNAen_HK
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, DNAen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Ribosomal, 16S - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshStreptococcal Infections - microbiologyen_HK
dc.titleGroup G beta-hemolytic Streptococcal bacteremia characterized by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0095-1137&volume=39&issue=9&spage=3147&epage=3155&date=2001&atitle=Group+G+beta-hemolytic+streptococcal+bacteremia+characterized+by+16S+ribosomal+RNA+gene+sequencingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSY:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSY=rp00395en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.39.9.3147-3155.2001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11526143en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC88311en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034823833en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros74404-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034823833&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3147en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3155en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000170837500021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, AMY=7101926801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSY=13310021400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

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