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Article: Oral colonization, phenotypic, and genotypic profiles of Candida species in irradiated, dentate, xerostomic nasopharyngeal carcinoma survivors

TitleOral colonization, phenotypic, and genotypic profiles of Candida species in irradiated, dentate, xerostomic nasopharyngeal carcinoma survivors
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2000, v. 38 n. 6, p. 2219-2226 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this study was to investigate oral yeast colonization and oral yeast strain diversity in irradiated (head and neck), dentate, xerostomic individuals. Subjects were recruited from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma clinic and were segregated into group A (age, <60 years [n = 25; average age ± standard deviation →SD←, 48 ± 6 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 5 ± 5 years]) and group B (age, ≥60 years [n = 8; average age ± SD, 67 ± 4 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 2 ± 2 years]) and were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals in group C (age, <60 years [n = 20; average age ± SD, 44 ± 12 years] and group D (age, ≥60 years [n = 10; average age, 70 ± 3 years]). Selective culture of oral rinse samples was carried out to isolate, quantify, and speciate yeast recovery. All test subjects underwent a 3-month comprehensive oral and preventive care regimen plus topical antifungal therapy, if indicated. A total of 12 subjects from group A and 5 subjects from group B were recalled for reassessment of yeast colonization. Sequential (pre- and posttherapy) Candida isolate pairs from patients were phenotypically (all isolate pairs; biotyping and resistotyping profiles) and genotypically (Candida albicans isolate pairs only; electrophoretic karyotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP], and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] assays) evaluated. All isolates were Candida species. Irradiated individuals were found to have a significantly increased yeast carriage compared with the controls. The isolation rate of Candida posttherapy remained unchanged. A total of 9 of the 12 subjects in group A and 3 of the 5 subjects in group B harbored the same C. albicans or Candida tropicalis phenotype at recall. Varying degrees of congruence in the molecular profiles were observed when these sequential isolate pairs of C. albicans were analyzed by RFLP and RAPD assays. Variations in the genotype were complementary to those in the phenotypic characteristics for some isolates. In conclusion, irradiation-induced xerostomia seems to favor intraoral colonization of Candida species, particularly C. albicans, which appeared to undergo temporal modifications in clonal profiles both phenotypically and genotypically following hygienic and preventive oral care which included topical antifungal therapy, if indicated. We postulate that the observed ability of Candida species to undergo genetic and phenotypic adaptation could strategically enhance its survival in the human oral cavity, particularly when salivary defenses are impaired.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49195
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDassanayake, RSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, JYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJin, LJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYam, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:36:30Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:36:30Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2000, v. 38 n. 6, p. 2219-2226en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49195-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate oral yeast colonization and oral yeast strain diversity in irradiated (head and neck), dentate, xerostomic individuals. Subjects were recruited from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma clinic and were segregated into group A (age, <60 years [n = 25; average age ± standard deviation →SD←, 48 ± 6 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 5 ± 5 years]) and group B (age, ≥60 years [n = 8; average age ± SD, 67 ± 4 years; average postirradiation time ± SD, 2 ± 2 years]) and were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals in group C (age, <60 years [n = 20; average age ± SD, 44 ± 12 years] and group D (age, ≥60 years [n = 10; average age, 70 ± 3 years]). Selective culture of oral rinse samples was carried out to isolate, quantify, and speciate yeast recovery. All test subjects underwent a 3-month comprehensive oral and preventive care regimen plus topical antifungal therapy, if indicated. A total of 12 subjects from group A and 5 subjects from group B were recalled for reassessment of yeast colonization. Sequential (pre- and posttherapy) Candida isolate pairs from patients were phenotypically (all isolate pairs; biotyping and resistotyping profiles) and genotypically (Candida albicans isolate pairs only; electrophoretic karyotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP], and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] assays) evaluated. All isolates were Candida species. Irradiated individuals were found to have a significantly increased yeast carriage compared with the controls. The isolation rate of Candida posttherapy remained unchanged. A total of 9 of the 12 subjects in group A and 3 of the 5 subjects in group B harbored the same C. albicans or Candida tropicalis phenotype at recall. Varying degrees of congruence in the molecular profiles were observed when these sequential isolate pairs of C. albicans were analyzed by RFLP and RAPD assays. Variations in the genotype were complementary to those in the phenotypic characteristics for some isolates. In conclusion, irradiation-induced xerostomia seems to favor intraoral colonization of Candida species, particularly C. albicans, which appeared to undergo temporal modifications in clonal profiles both phenotypically and genotypically following hygienic and preventive oral care which included topical antifungal therapy, if indicated. We postulate that the observed ability of Candida species to undergo genetic and phenotypic adaptation could strategically enhance its survival in the human oral cavity, particularly when salivary defenses are impaired.en_HK
dc.format.extent390 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Microbiology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2000, v. 38 n. 6, p. 2219-2226en_HK
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma - complications - radiotherapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDentures - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - complications - radiotherapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshXerostomia - complicationsen_HK
dc.titleOral colonization, phenotypic, and genotypic profiles of Candida species in irradiated, dentate, xerostomic nasopharyngeal carcinoma survivorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0095-1137&volume=38&issue=6&spage=2219&epage=2226&date=2000&atitle=Oral+colonization,+phenotypic,+and+genotypic+profiles+of+Candida+species+in+irradiated,+dentate,+xerostomic+nasopharyngeal+carcinoma+survivorsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK:ewkleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJin, LJ:ljjin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYam, WC:wcyam@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp00019en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJin, LJ=rp00028en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYam, WC=rp00313en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10834980-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC86768en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034092416en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros49460-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034092416&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2219en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2226en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000087428600033-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WK=25224691800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDassanayake, RS=6603321318en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, JYY=7102167568en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, LJ=7403328850en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYam, WC=7004281720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK

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