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Article: Human parainfluenza virus 4 outbreak and the role of diagnostic tests
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TitleHuman parainfluenza virus 4 outbreak and the role of diagnostic tests
 
AuthorsLau, SKP1
To, WK3
Tse, PWT3
Chan, AKH3
Woo, PCY1
Tsoi, HW1
Leung, AFY3
Li, KSM1
Chan, PKS4
Lim, WWL2
Yung, RWH2
Chan, KH1
Yuen, KY1
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2005, v. 43 n. 9, p. 4515-4521 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.43.9.4515-4521.2005
 
AbstractOwing to the difficulties in isolating the virus and the lack of routine surveillance, the clinical significance of human parainfluenza virus 4 (HPIV-4) is less well defined than that of the other human parainfluenza viruses. We describe the first outbreak of HPIV-4 infection in a developmental disabilities unit, involving 38 institutionalized children and three staff members, during a 3-week period in autumn 2004. Most subjects had upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), while lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) occurred in three children (7%), one complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilation support. All patients recovered. Nasopharyngeal aspirates tested for HPIV-4 were positive by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) in all 41 cases (100%), by direct immunofluorescence in 29 of 39 tested cases (74%), and by cell cultures in 6 of 37 cases (16%), and serum was positive for antibodies against HPIV-4 in all 35 cases (100%) with serum samples available. In addition, RT-PCR detected HPIV-4 in four children (three LRTI and one URTI) out of 115 patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infection. Molecular analysis of the 1,198-bp phosphoprotein sequences showed that HPIV-4 isolates among the cases were genetically similar, whereas the community controls were more genetically distant, supporting nosocomial transmission of a single HPIV-4 genotype during the outbreak. Moreover, the HPIV-4 causing the outbreak is more closely related to HPIV-4A than HPIV-4B. HPIV-4 may be an important cause of more severe respiratory illness in children. The present RT-PCR assay is a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for the diagnosing HPIV-4 infection. To better define the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of disease of HPIV-4 infections, HPIV-4 should be included in the routine panels of respiratory virus detection on respiratory specimens. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
 
ISSN0095-1137
2013 Impact Factor: 4.232
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.43.9.4515-4521.2005
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1234116
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000232020400031
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorTo, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, PWT
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, AKH
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, HW
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AFY
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, KSM
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, PKS
 
dc.contributor.authorLim, WWL
 
dc.contributor.authorYung, RWH
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:36:00Z
 
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:36:00Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractOwing to the difficulties in isolating the virus and the lack of routine surveillance, the clinical significance of human parainfluenza virus 4 (HPIV-4) is less well defined than that of the other human parainfluenza viruses. We describe the first outbreak of HPIV-4 infection in a developmental disabilities unit, involving 38 institutionalized children and three staff members, during a 3-week period in autumn 2004. Most subjects had upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), while lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) occurred in three children (7%), one complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilation support. All patients recovered. Nasopharyngeal aspirates tested for HPIV-4 were positive by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) in all 41 cases (100%), by direct immunofluorescence in 29 of 39 tested cases (74%), and by cell cultures in 6 of 37 cases (16%), and serum was positive for antibodies against HPIV-4 in all 35 cases (100%) with serum samples available. In addition, RT-PCR detected HPIV-4 in four children (three LRTI and one URTI) out of 115 patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infection. Molecular analysis of the 1,198-bp phosphoprotein sequences showed that HPIV-4 isolates among the cases were genetically similar, whereas the community controls were more genetically distant, supporting nosocomial transmission of a single HPIV-4 genotype during the outbreak. Moreover, the HPIV-4 causing the outbreak is more closely related to HPIV-4A than HPIV-4B. HPIV-4 may be an important cause of more severe respiratory illness in children. The present RT-PCR assay is a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for the diagnosing HPIV-4 infection. To better define the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of disease of HPIV-4 infections, HPIV-4 should be included in the routine panels of respiratory virus detection on respiratory specimens. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent388 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2005, v. 43 n. 9, p. 4515-4521 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.43.9.4515-4521.2005
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.43.9.4515-4521.2005
 
dc.identifier.epage4521
 
dc.identifier.hkuros114674
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232020400031
 
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137
2013 Impact Factor: 4.232
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1234116
 
dc.identifier.pmid16145100
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24744440562
 
dc.identifier.spage4515
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49171
 
dc.identifier.volume43
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Microbiology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2005, v. 43 n. 9, p. 4515-4521
 
dc.subject.meshCross Infection - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks
 
dc.subject.meshParainfluenza Virus 4, Human - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
 
dc.subject.meshRubulavirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - blood
 
dc.titleHuman parainfluenza virus 4 outbreak and the role of diagnostic tests
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Centre for Health Protection
  3. Caritas Medical Centre Hong Kong
  4. Chinese University of Hong Kong