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Article: Are ducks contributing to the endemicity of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in Asia?

TitleAre ducks contributing to the endemicity of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in Asia?
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 17, p. 11269-11279 How to Cite?
AbstractWild waterfowl are the natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses, and these viruses are usually nonpathogenic in these birds. However, since late 2002, H5N1 outbreaks in Asia have resulted in mortality among waterfowl in recreational parks, domestic flocks, and wild migratory birds. The evolutionary stasis between influenza virus and its natural host may have been disrupted, prompting us to ask whether waterfowl are resistant to H5N1 influenza virus disease and whether they can still act as a reservoir for these viruses. To better understand the biology of H5N1 viruses in ducks and attempt to answer this question, we inoculated juvenile mallards with 23 different H5N1 influenza viruses isolated in Asia between 2003 and 2004. All virus isolates replicated efficiently in inoculated ducks, and 22 were transmitted to susceptible contacts. Viruses replicated to higher levels in the trachea than in the cloaca of both inoculated and contact birds, suggesting that the digestive tract is not the main site of H5N1 influenza virus replication in ducks and that the fecal-oral route may no longer be the main transmission path. The virus isolates' pathogenicities varied from completely nonpathogenic to highly lethal and were positively correlated with tracheal virus titers. Nevertheless, the eight virus isolates that were nonpathogenic in ducks replicated and transmitted efficiently to naïve contacts, suggesting that highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses causing minimal signs of disease in ducks can propagate silently and efficiently among domestic and wild ducks in Asia and that they represent a serious threat to human and veterinary public health. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49167
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSturm-Ramirez, KMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHulse-Post, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGovorkova, EAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHumberd, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSeiler, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPuthavathana, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBuranathai, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, TDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChaisingh, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLong, HTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNaipospos, TSPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEllis, TMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:35:55Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:35:55Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 17, p. 11269-11279en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49167-
dc.description.abstractWild waterfowl are the natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses, and these viruses are usually nonpathogenic in these birds. However, since late 2002, H5N1 outbreaks in Asia have resulted in mortality among waterfowl in recreational parks, domestic flocks, and wild migratory birds. The evolutionary stasis between influenza virus and its natural host may have been disrupted, prompting us to ask whether waterfowl are resistant to H5N1 influenza virus disease and whether they can still act as a reservoir for these viruses. To better understand the biology of H5N1 viruses in ducks and attempt to answer this question, we inoculated juvenile mallards with 23 different H5N1 influenza viruses isolated in Asia between 2003 and 2004. All virus isolates replicated efficiently in inoculated ducks, and 22 were transmitted to susceptible contacts. Viruses replicated to higher levels in the trachea than in the cloaca of both inoculated and contact birds, suggesting that the digestive tract is not the main site of H5N1 influenza virus replication in ducks and that the fecal-oral route may no longer be the main transmission path. The virus isolates' pathogenicities varied from completely nonpathogenic to highly lethal and were positively correlated with tracheal virus titers. Nevertheless, the eight virus isolates that were nonpathogenic in ducks replicated and transmitted efficiently to naïve contacts, suggesting that highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses causing minimal signs of disease in ducks can propagate silently and efficiently among domestic and wild ducks in Asia and that they represent a serious threat to human and veterinary public health. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.format.extent388 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 17, p. 11269-11279en_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtypeen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A virus - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - transmission - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTrachea - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshVirulenceen_HK
dc.titleAre ducks contributing to the endemicity of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in Asia?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-538X&volume=79&issue=17&spage=11269&epage=11279&date=2005&atitle=Are+ducks+contributing+to+the+endemicity+of+highly+pathogenic+H5N1+influenza+virus+in+Asia?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWebster, RG: stjude@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.79.17.11269-11279.2005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16103179-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1193583en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23844501262en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros110166-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23844501262&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume79en_HK
dc.identifier.issue17en_HK
dc.identifier.spage11269en_HK
dc.identifier.epage11279en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231303900043-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSturmRamirez, KM=6507645950en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHulsePost, DJ=11940084300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGovorkova, EA=7003837718en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHumberd, J=6506769380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSeiler, P=7005281020en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPuthavathana, P=7004642707en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBuranathai, C=6507522489en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNguyen, TD=25227791100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChaisingh, A=12799046900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLong, HT=7102434129en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNaipospos, TSP=8722763000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=26643315400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEllis, TM=7202589926en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, RG=36048363100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6885615-

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