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Article: Molecular evolution analysis and geographic investigation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in palm civets at an animal market and on farms
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TitleMolecular evolution analysis and geographic investigation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in palm civets at an animal market and on farms
 
AuthorsKan, B3
Wang, M1
Jing, H3
Xu, H1
Jiang, X3
Yan, M3
Liang, W3
Zheng, H3
Wan, K3
Liu, Q3
Cui, B3
Xu, Y3
Zhang, E3
Wang, H3
Ye, J3
Li, G3
Li, M3
Cui, Z3
Qi, X3
Chen, K1
Du, L1
Gao, K1
Zhao, YT1
Zou, XZ1
Feng, YJ1
Gao, YF1
Hai, R3
Yu, D3
Guan, Y2
Xu, J3
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
 
CitationJournal Of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 18, p. 11892-11900 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.79.18.11892-11900.2005
 
AbstractMassive numbers of palm civets were culled to remove sources for the reemergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province, China, in January 2004, following SARS coronavirus detection in market animals. The virus was identified in all 91 palm civets and 15 raccoon dogs of animal market origin sampled prior to culling, but not in 1,107 palm civets later sampled at 25 farms, spread over 12 provinces, which were claimed to be the source of traded animals. Twenty-seven novel signature variation residues (SNVs) were identified on the spike gene and were analyzed for their phylogenetic relationships, based on 17 sequences obtained from animals in our study and from other published studies. Analysis indicated that the virus in palm civets at the live-animal market had evolved to infect humans. The evolutionary starting point was a prototype group consisting of three viral sequences of animal origin. Initially, seven SNV sites caused six amino acid changes, at positions 147, 228, 240, 479, 821, and 1080 of the spike protein, to generate low-pathogenicity viruses. One of these was linked to the first SARS patient in the 2003-2004 period. A further 14 SNVs caused 11 amino acid residue changes, at positions 360, 462, 472, 480, 487, 609, 613, 665, 743, 765, and 1163. The resulting high-pathogenicity groups were responsible for infections during the so-called early-phase epidemic of 2003. Finally, the remaining six SNVs caused four amino acid changes, at positions 227, 244, 344, and 778, which resulted in the group of viruses responsible for the global epidemic. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
 
DescriptionErratum in: Journal of Virology 2006 Aug;80(15):7786
 
ISSN0022-538X
2012 Impact Factor: 5.076
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.559
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.79.18.11892-11900.2005
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1212604
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000231633900034
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorKan, B
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.contributor.authorJing, H
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, X
 
dc.contributor.authorYan, M
 
dc.contributor.authorLiang, W
 
dc.contributor.authorZheng, H
 
dc.contributor.authorWan, K
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorCui, B
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, E
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, H
 
dc.contributor.authorYe, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, G
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, M
 
dc.contributor.authorCui, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorQi, X
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, K
 
dc.contributor.authorDu, L
 
dc.contributor.authorGao, K
 
dc.contributor.authorZhao, YT
 
dc.contributor.authorZou, XZ
 
dc.contributor.authorFeng, YJ
 
dc.contributor.authorGao, YF
 
dc.contributor.authorHai, R
 
dc.contributor.authorYu, D
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:35:54Z
 
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:35:54Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractMassive numbers of palm civets were culled to remove sources for the reemergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province, China, in January 2004, following SARS coronavirus detection in market animals. The virus was identified in all 91 palm civets and 15 raccoon dogs of animal market origin sampled prior to culling, but not in 1,107 palm civets later sampled at 25 farms, spread over 12 provinces, which were claimed to be the source of traded animals. Twenty-seven novel signature variation residues (SNVs) were identified on the spike gene and were analyzed for their phylogenetic relationships, based on 17 sequences obtained from animals in our study and from other published studies. Analysis indicated that the virus in palm civets at the live-animal market had evolved to infect humans. The evolutionary starting point was a prototype group consisting of three viral sequences of animal origin. Initially, seven SNV sites caused six amino acid changes, at positions 147, 228, 240, 479, 821, and 1080 of the spike protein, to generate low-pathogenicity viruses. One of these was linked to the first SARS patient in the 2003-2004 period. A further 14 SNVs caused 11 amino acid residue changes, at positions 360, 462, 472, 480, 487, 609, 613, 665, 743, 765, and 1163. The resulting high-pathogenicity groups were responsible for infections during the so-called early-phase epidemic of 2003. Finally, the remaining six SNVs caused four amino acid changes, at positions 227, 244, 344, and 778, which resulted in the group of viruses responsible for the global epidemic. Copyright © 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.descriptionErratum in: Journal of Virology 2006 Aug;80(15):7786
 
dc.format.extent388 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 18, p. 11892-11900 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.79.18.11892-11900.2005
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.79.18.11892-11900.2005
 
dc.identifier.epage11900
 
dc.identifier.hkuros110152
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231633900034
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-538X
2012 Impact Factor: 5.076
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.559
 
dc.identifier.issue18
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1212604
 
dc.identifier.pmid16140765
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24644457565
 
dc.identifier.spage11892
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49166
 
dc.identifier.volume79
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Virology, 2005, v. 79 n. 18, p. 11892-11900
 
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecular
 
dc.subject.meshSARS Virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
 
dc.subject.meshViverridae - virology
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission - virology
 
dc.subject.meshViral Envelope Proteins - genetics
 
dc.titleMolecular evolution analysis and geographic investigation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in palm civets at an animal market and on farms
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Guangdong Center for Disease Control and Prevention
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention