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Article: Differences in genotypes of Helicobacter pylori from different human populations

TitleDifferences in genotypes of Helicobacter pylori from different human populations
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Journal Of Bacteriology, 2000, v. 182 n. 11, p. 3210-3218 How to Cite?
AbstractDNA motifs at several informative loci in more than 500 strains of Helicobacter pylori from five continents were studied by PCR and sequencing to gain insights into the evolution of this gastric pathogen. Five types of deletion, insertion, and substitution motifs were found at the right end of the H. pylori cag pathogenicity island. Of the three most common motifs, type I predominated in Spaniards, native Peruvians, and Guatemalan Ladinos (mixed Amerindian-European ancestry) and also in native Africans and U.S. residents; type II predominated among Japanese and Chinese; and type III predominated in Indians from Calcutta. Sequences in the cagA gene and in vacAm1 type alleles of the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) of strains from native Peruvians were also more like those from Spaniards than those from Asians. These indications of relatedness of Latin American and Spanish strains, despite the closer genetic relatedness of Amerindian and Asian people themselves, lead us to suggest that H. pylori may have been brought to the New World by European conquerors and colonists about 500 years ago. This thinking, in turn, suggests that H. pylori infection might have become widespread in people quite recently in human evolution.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49106
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.198
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.216
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKersulyte, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorMukhopadhyay, AKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVelapatiño, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorSu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPan, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorValdez, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMistry, RSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGilman, RHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGao, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlarcón, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorLópezBrea, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorNair, GBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChowdhury, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDatta, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShirai, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorNakazawa, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlly, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSegal, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOlfat, FOen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBorén, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorEngstrand, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorTorres, Oen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, JEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCzinn, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBerg, DEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:34:33Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:34:33Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Bacteriology, 2000, v. 182 n. 11, p. 3210-3218en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9193en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49106-
dc.description.abstractDNA motifs at several informative loci in more than 500 strains of Helicobacter pylori from five continents were studied by PCR and sequencing to gain insights into the evolution of this gastric pathogen. Five types of deletion, insertion, and substitution motifs were found at the right end of the H. pylori cag pathogenicity island. Of the three most common motifs, type I predominated in Spaniards, native Peruvians, and Guatemalan Ladinos (mixed Amerindian-European ancestry) and also in native Africans and U.S. residents; type II predominated among Japanese and Chinese; and type III predominated in Indians from Calcutta. Sequences in the cagA gene and in vacAm1 type alleles of the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) of strains from native Peruvians were also more like those from Spaniards than those from Asians. These indications of relatedness of Latin American and Spanish strains, despite the closer genetic relatedness of Amerindian and Asian people themselves, lead us to suggest that H. pylori may have been brought to the New World by European conquerors and colonists about 500 years ago. This thinking, in turn, suggests that H. pylori infection might have become widespread in people quite recently in human evolution.en_HK
dc.format.extent384 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Bacteriologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Bacteriology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Bacteriology, 2000, v. 182 n. 11, p. 3210-8en_HK
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Bacterialen_HK
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter pylori - classification - genetics - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Isomerases - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacterial Proteins - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleDifferences in genotypes of Helicobacter pylori from different human populationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0021-9193&volume=182&issue=11&spage=3210&epage=8&date=2000&atitle=Differences+in+genotypes+of+Helicobacter+pylori+from+different+human+populationsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, BCY:bcywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BCY=rp00429en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JB.182.11.3210-3218.2000en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10809702en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC94509en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12944277033en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros50519-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-12944277033&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume182en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3210en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3218en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000086988000029-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKersulyte, D=6603724765en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMukhopadhyay, AK=7201816905en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVelapatiño, B=6602471719en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, W=7402010414en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPan, Z=8202190900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGarcia, C=16303598100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHernandez, V=36939319700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridValdez, Y=6602199319en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMistry, RS=7006377283en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGilman, RH=36044231400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuan, Y=36553559300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, H=37020927100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlarcón, T=7006664623en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLópezBrea, M=7006186648en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNair, GB=7201482255en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChowdhury, A=7202527781en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDatta, S=7401496889en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShirai, M=7202108980en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNakazawa, T=7201997713en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlly, R=36954508500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSegal, I=7103331239en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, BCY=7402023340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SK=7402279473en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOlfat, FO=6508281035en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBorén, T=7004203818en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEngstrand, L=7006203192en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTorres, O=7006437249en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchneider, R=7403512930en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, JE=8647214100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCzinn, S=7006560067en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerg, DE=7202401139en_HK

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