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Article: Reading depends on writing, in Chinese

TitleReading depends on writing, in Chinese
Authors
KeywordsChild language
Dyslexia
Phonological awareness
Reading Chinese
Reading development
Issue Date2005
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2005, v. 102 n. 24, p. 8781-8785 How to Cite?
AbstractLanguage development entails four fundamental and interactive abilities: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Over the past four decades, a large body of evidence has indicated that reading acquisition is strongly associated with a child's listening skills, particularly the child's sensitivity to phonological structures of spoken language. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that the close relationship between reading and listening is manifested universally across languages and that behavioral remediation using strategies addressing phonological awareness alleviates reading difficulties in dyslexics. The prevailing view of the central role of phonological awareness in reading development is largely based on studies using Western (alphabetic) languages, which are based on phonology. The Chinese language provides a unique medium for testing this notion, because logographic characters in Chinese are based on meaning rather than phonology. Here we show that the ability to read Chinese is strongly related to a child's writing skills and that the relationship between phonological awareness and Chinese reading is much weaker than that in reports regarding alphabetic languages. We propose that the role of logograph writing in reading development is mediated by two possibly interacting mechanisms. The first is orthographic awareness, which facilitates the development of coherent, effective links among visual symbols, phonology, and semantics; the second involves the establishment of motor programs that lead to the formation of long-term motor memories of Chinese characters. These findings yield a unique insight into how cognitive systems responsible for reading development and reading disability interact, and they challenge the prominent phonological awareness view. © 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49033
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEden, GFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPerfetti, CAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSiok, WTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:32:50Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2005, v. 102 n. 24, p. 8781-8785en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49033-
dc.description.abstractLanguage development entails four fundamental and interactive abilities: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Over the past four decades, a large body of evidence has indicated that reading acquisition is strongly associated with a child's listening skills, particularly the child's sensitivity to phonological structures of spoken language. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that the close relationship between reading and listening is manifested universally across languages and that behavioral remediation using strategies addressing phonological awareness alleviates reading difficulties in dyslexics. The prevailing view of the central role of phonological awareness in reading development is largely based on studies using Western (alphabetic) languages, which are based on phonology. The Chinese language provides a unique medium for testing this notion, because logographic characters in Chinese are based on meaning rather than phonology. Here we show that the ability to read Chinese is strongly related to a child's writing skills and that the relationship between phonological awareness and Chinese reading is much weaker than that in reports regarding alphabetic languages. We propose that the role of logograph writing in reading development is mediated by two possibly interacting mechanisms. The first is orthographic awareness, which facilitates the development of coherent, effective links among visual symbols, phonology, and semantics; the second involves the establishment of motor programs that lead to the formation of long-term motor memories of Chinese characters. These findings yield a unique insight into how cognitive systems responsible for reading development and reading disability interact, and they challenge the prominent phonological awareness view. © 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.en_HK
dc.format.extent388 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_HK
dc.rightsNational Academy of Sciences Proceedings. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChild languageen_HK
dc.subjectDyslexiaen_HK
dc.subjectPhonological awarenessen_HK
dc.subjectReading Chineseen_HK
dc.subjectReading developmenten_HK
dc.titleReading depends on writing, in Chineseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0027-8424&volume=102&issue=24&spage=8781&epage=8785&date=2005&atitle=Reading+depends+on+writing,+in+Chineseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSpinks, JA: spinks@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSiok, WT: siok@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySpinks, JA=rp00063en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySiok, WT=rp01208en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0503523102en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15939871-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1150863en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20844451902en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros102689-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20844451902&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume102en_HK
dc.identifier.issue24en_HK
dc.identifier.spage8781en_HK
dc.identifier.epage8785en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229807200068-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpinks, JA=6701628658en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEden, GF=7007184492en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerfetti, CA=7005318729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiok, WT=6602471035en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike295961-

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