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Article: Acromial arch shape: assessment with MR imaging
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TitleAcromial arch shape: assessment with MR imaging
 
AuthorsPeh, CG
Farmer, HR
Totty, WG1
 
KeywordsShoulder, injuries, 414.4813
Shoulder, MR, 414.1214
Tendons, MB., 414.1214
 
Issue Date1995
 
PublisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
CitationRadiology, 1995, v. 195 n. 2, p. 501-505 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractBACKGROUND. The long-term management of patients with chronic conditions such as hypertension presents problems for the health services. Shared care addresses these by coordinating care and defining responsibilities. AIM. This study set out to investigate the feasibility, acceptability and cost effectiveness of shared general practitioner-hospital care for well-controlled hypertensive patients in an urban area by comparing three matched groups of patients. METHOD. A total of 554 outpatient clinic attenders, considered suitable for shared care by their consultant, were randomly allocated to shared care or follow up in the outpatient clinic; a third group of 277 patients was selected from a nurse practitioner clinic. Main outcome measures were the proportion of patients in the second year of follow up who had undergone a complete review (blood pressure measurement, serum creatinine level result and electrocardiograph report), acceptability to patients and general practitioners as assessed by questionnaire, and cost per complete review in year two (National Health Service and patient costs). RESULTS. After two years 220 (82%) shared care patients had had a complete review compared with 146 (54%) outpatient clinic attenders and 202 (75%) nurse practitioner clinic attenders. Blood pressure control was similar in each group. Of 297 general practitioners invited, 85% wished to participate in the study; 61% of questionnaire respondents subsequently wanted shared care to continue while 25% were unsure. Half of the patients receiving shared care preferred this method of follow up. The rank order of cost-effectiveness ratios was shared care, nurse practitioner care and conventional outpatient care, relative differences being most marked when only patient costs were considered. CONCLUSION. Shared care for hypertension is feasible in an urban setting, acceptable to the majority of participants and is a cost-effective method of long-term follow up.
 
ISSN0033-8419
2013 Impact Factor: 6.214
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:A1995QU71700036
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPeh, CG
 
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, HR
 
dc.contributor.authorTotty, WG
 
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:32:11Z
 
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:32:11Z
 
dc.date.issued1995
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. The long-term management of patients with chronic conditions such as hypertension presents problems for the health services. Shared care addresses these by coordinating care and defining responsibilities. AIM. This study set out to investigate the feasibility, acceptability and cost effectiveness of shared general practitioner-hospital care for well-controlled hypertensive patients in an urban area by comparing three matched groups of patients. METHOD. A total of 554 outpatient clinic attenders, considered suitable for shared care by their consultant, were randomly allocated to shared care or follow up in the outpatient clinic; a third group of 277 patients was selected from a nurse practitioner clinic. Main outcome measures were the proportion of patients in the second year of follow up who had undergone a complete review (blood pressure measurement, serum creatinine level result and electrocardiograph report), acceptability to patients and general practitioners as assessed by questionnaire, and cost per complete review in year two (National Health Service and patient costs). RESULTS. After two years 220 (82%) shared care patients had had a complete review compared with 146 (54%) outpatient clinic attenders and 202 (75%) nurse practitioner clinic attenders. Blood pressure control was similar in each group. Of 297 general practitioners invited, 85% wished to participate in the study; 61% of questionnaire respondents subsequently wanted shared care to continue while 25% were unsure. Half of the patients receiving shared care preferred this method of follow up. The rank order of cost-effectiveness ratios was shared care, nurse practitioner care and conventional outpatient care, relative differences being most marked when only patient costs were considered. CONCLUSION. Shared care for hypertension is feasible in an urban setting, acceptable to the majority of participants and is a cost-effective method of long-term follow up.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent418 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
 
dc.identifier.citationRadiology, 1995, v. 195 n. 2, p. 501-505 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.hkuros1454
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QU71700036
 
dc.identifier.issn0033-8419
2013 Impact Factor: 6.214
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid7724774
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028951591
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49010
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectShoulder, injuries, 414.4813
 
dc.subjectShoulder, MR, 414.1214
 
dc.subjectTendons, MB., 414.1214
 
dc.titleAcromial arch shape: assessment with MR imaging
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Edward Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology