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Article: Prolactin profile in a cohort of Chinese systemic lupus erythematosus patients

TitleProlactin profile in a cohort of Chinese systemic lupus erythematosus patients
Authors
KeywordsDisease activity
Hyperprolactinaemia
Issue Date1997
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Rheumatology, 1997, v. 36 n. 9, p. 986-989 How to Cite?
AbstractProlactin (PRL) is an important immunoregulatory hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland. Hyperprolactinaemia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, clinical studies regarding the PRL level and lupus disease activity have yielded contradictory results. The aim of our present study was, therefore, to re-evaluate the association of PRL level and disease activity in SLE by analysing a larger patient cohort and following them up serially. Seventy-two consecutive SLE patients were recruited and the serum PRL level was measured at each visit. Our results showed that hyperprolactinaemia (> 500 mIU/l) occurred in 35% (25/72) of the patients. A total of 72% (18/25) of the hyperprolactinaemic patients had mild elevation (arbitrarily defined as 500-800 mIU/l) of the level only. No correlation could be found between the PRL level and various clinical and serological parameters of lupus disease activity. On serial follow-up of 44 patients, again no correlation between PRL and disease activity could be demonstrated. We conclude that hyperprolactinaemia occurs in some patients with SLE, but the serum level of PRL does not correlate with clinical or serological disease activity and is not a reliable marker for disease monitoring. The mechanism and pathoaetiological and clinical significance of hyperprolactinaemia in a small subset of SLE patients remain unclear and a longer follow-up is necessary.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48971
ISSN
2000 Impact Factor: 3.949
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, CCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, SCFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:31:05Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:31:05Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Rheumatology, 1997, v. 36 n. 9, p. 986-989en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0263-7103en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48971-
dc.description.abstractProlactin (PRL) is an important immunoregulatory hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland. Hyperprolactinaemia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, clinical studies regarding the PRL level and lupus disease activity have yielded contradictory results. The aim of our present study was, therefore, to re-evaluate the association of PRL level and disease activity in SLE by analysing a larger patient cohort and following them up serially. Seventy-two consecutive SLE patients were recruited and the serum PRL level was measured at each visit. Our results showed that hyperprolactinaemia (> 500 mIU/l) occurred in 35% (25/72) of the patients. A total of 72% (18/25) of the hyperprolactinaemic patients had mild elevation (arbitrarily defined as 500-800 mIU/l) of the level only. No correlation could be found between the PRL level and various clinical and serological parameters of lupus disease activity. On serial follow-up of 44 patients, again no correlation between PRL and disease activity could be demonstrated. We conclude that hyperprolactinaemia occurs in some patients with SLE, but the serum level of PRL does not correlate with clinical or serological disease activity and is not a reliable marker for disease monitoring. The mechanism and pathoaetiological and clinical significance of hyperprolactinaemia in a small subset of SLE patients remain unclear and a longer follow-up is necessary.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Rheumatologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectDisease activityen_HK
dc.subjectHyperprolactinaemiaen_HK
dc.titleProlactin profile in a cohort of Chinese systemic lupus erythematosus patientsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0263-7103&volume=36&issue=9&spage=986&epage=989&date=1997&atitle=Prolactin+profile+in+a+cohort+of+Chinese+systemic+lupus+erythematosus+patientsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS:cslau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/rheumatology/36.9.986en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9376996-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030770538en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros37349-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030770538&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage986en_HK
dc.identifier.epage989en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XZ11800012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, CC=34668219600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, SCF=7202037323en_HK

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