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Article: An optimization model for mastication and swallowing in mammals

TitleAn optimization model for mastication and swallowing in mammals
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=1087
Citation
Royal Society of London Proceedings Biological Sciences, 1997, v. 264 n. 1389, p. 1715-1721 How to Cite?
AbstractMammalian mastication is a process combining simultaneous food comminution and lubrication. The initiation of swallowing, which is voluntary, has been thought to depend on separate thresholds for food particle size and for particle lubrication. Instead of this duality, we suggest that swallowing is initiated when it is sensed that a batch of food particles is binding together under viscous forces so as to form a bolus. Bolus formation ensures that when the food mass is swallowed, it will pass the pharyngeal region safely without risk of inhaling small particles into the lower respiratory tract. Crucial for bolus formation is food particle size reduction by mastication. This allows the tongue to pack particles together tightly by pressure against the hard palate. A major function of salivation is to fill the gradually reducing spaces between particles, so increasing viscous cohesion and promoting bolus formation. If swallowing is delayed, excessive saliva floods the bolus, separating particles and reducing cohesion. Swallowing then becomes more precarious. Our model suggests that there is an optimum moment for a mammal to swallow, defined in terms of a peak cohesive force between food particles. The model is tested on human mastication with two foods, brazil nut and raw carrot, which have very different particle size breakdown rates. The peak cohesive force is much greater with brazil nuts but both foods are predicted to be swallowed after similar numbers of chews despite the very different food particle size reductions achieved at that stage. The predicted number of chews to swallow is in broad agreement with published data.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48953
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.823
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.375
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPrinz, JFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLucas, PWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:30:36Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:30:36Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRoyal Society of London Proceedings Biological Sciences, 1997, v. 264 n. 1389, p. 1715-1721en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48953-
dc.description.abstractMammalian mastication is a process combining simultaneous food comminution and lubrication. The initiation of swallowing, which is voluntary, has been thought to depend on separate thresholds for food particle size and for particle lubrication. Instead of this duality, we suggest that swallowing is initiated when it is sensed that a batch of food particles is binding together under viscous forces so as to form a bolus. Bolus formation ensures that when the food mass is swallowed, it will pass the pharyngeal region safely without risk of inhaling small particles into the lower respiratory tract. Crucial for bolus formation is food particle size reduction by mastication. This allows the tongue to pack particles together tightly by pressure against the hard palate. A major function of salivation is to fill the gradually reducing spaces between particles, so increasing viscous cohesion and promoting bolus formation. If swallowing is delayed, excessive saliva floods the bolus, separating particles and reducing cohesion. Swallowing then becomes more precarious. Our model suggests that there is an optimum moment for a mammal to swallow, defined in terms of a peak cohesive force between food particles. The model is tested on human mastication with two foods, brazil nut and raw carrot, which have very different particle size breakdown rates. The peak cohesive force is much greater with brazil nuts but both foods are predicted to be swallowed after similar numbers of chews despite the very different food particle size reductions achieved at that stage. The predicted number of chews to swallow is in broad agreement with published data.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=1087en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshDeglutition - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMastication - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMathematical Computingen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.titleAn optimization model for mastication and swallowing in mammalsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0962-8452&volume=264&issue=1389&spage=1715&epage=1721&date=1997&atitle=An+optimization+model+for+mastication+and+swallowing+in+mammalsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPrinz, JF: j.f.prinz@mds.qmw.ac.uken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLucas, PW: pwlucas@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.1997.0238en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9447729-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1688744-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031583901-
dc.identifier.hkuros31618-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000071480200002-

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