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Article: High oral prevalence of Candida krusei in leprosy patients in Northern Thailand

TitleHigh oral prevalence of Candida krusei in leprosy patients in Northern Thailand
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2002, v. 40 n. 12, p. 4479-4485 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen, other Candida species such as C. krusei are now recognized as emerging agents, especially in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. C. krusei is inherently resistant to the widely used triazole antifungal fluconazole and poses therapeutic problems, especially in systemic candidiasis. In a surveillance study of leprosy patients (with arrested or burnt-out disease) in a leprosarium in northern Thailand, we found a rate of oral carriage of C. krusei (36%) significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that for a healthy control group (10%). Among the Candida-positive patients, 16 of 35 (46%) carried C. krusei, while C. albicans was the second most common isolate (12 of 35 patients; 34%). The corresponding figures for the control group were 2 of 13 (15%) and 6 of 13 (46%), respectively. Studies of the antifungal resistance of the C. krusei isolates from patients indicated that all except one of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, two isolates were resistant to ketoconazole, and all isolates were sensitive to amphotericin B. Evaluation of their genetic profiles by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis with three different primers and subsequent analysis of the gel profiles by computerized cluster-derived dendrograms revealed that the C. krusei isolates from patients belonged to 10 disparate clusters, despite the origin from a single locale. These nascent findings indicate an alarmingly high prevalence of a Candida species resistant to a widely used antifungal in a part of the world where HIV disease is endemic.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48934
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorReichart, PAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGrote, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorPow, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:30:02Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:30:02Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 2002, v. 40 n. 12, p. 4479-4485en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48934-
dc.description.abstractAlthough Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen, other Candida species such as C. krusei are now recognized as emerging agents, especially in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. C. krusei is inherently resistant to the widely used triazole antifungal fluconazole and poses therapeutic problems, especially in systemic candidiasis. In a surveillance study of leprosy patients (with arrested or burnt-out disease) in a leprosarium in northern Thailand, we found a rate of oral carriage of C. krusei (36%) significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that for a healthy control group (10%). Among the Candida-positive patients, 16 of 35 (46%) carried C. krusei, while C. albicans was the second most common isolate (12 of 35 patients; 34%). The corresponding figures for the control group were 2 of 13 (15%) and 6 of 13 (46%), respectively. Studies of the antifungal resistance of the C. krusei isolates from patients indicated that all except one of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, two isolates were resistant to ketoconazole, and all isolates were sensitive to amphotericin B. Evaluation of their genetic profiles by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis with three different primers and subsequent analysis of the gel profiles by computerized cluster-derived dendrograms revealed that the C. krusei isolates from patients belonged to 10 disparate clusters, despite the origin from a single locale. These nascent findings indicate an alarmingly high prevalence of a Candida species resistant to a widely used antifungal in a part of the world where HIV disease is endemic.en_HK
dc.format.extent386 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Microbiology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2002, v. 40 n. 12, p. 4479-4485en_HK
dc.subject.meshCandida - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - complications - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCarrier State - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLeprosy - complicationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntifungal Agents - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.titleHigh oral prevalence of Candida krusei in leprosy patients in Northern Thailanden_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0095-1137&volume=40&issue=12&spage=4479&epage=4485&date=2002&atitle=High+oral+prevalence+of+Candida+krusei+in+leprosy+patients+in+northern+Thailanden_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH:hema@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPow, E:ehnpow@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPow, E=rp00030en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.40.12.4479-4485.2002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12454139-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC154582en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18744407547en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros75294-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-18744407547&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4479en_HK
dc.identifier.epage4485en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179631500013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReichart, PA=7101871704en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, YH=6602677237en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGrote, M=35806224600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPow, E=6603825799en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, B=7103294773en_HK

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