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Article: Experimental oral candidiasis in animal models

TitleExperimental oral candidiasis in animal models
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 2001, v. 14 n. 2, p. 398-429 How to Cite?
AbstractOral candidiasis is as much the final outcome of the vulnerability of the host as of the virulence of the invading organism. We review here the extensive literature on animal experiments mainly appertaining to the host predisposing factors that initiate and perpetuate these infections. The monkey, rat, and mouse are the choice models for investigating oral candidiasis, but comparisons between the same or different models appear difficult, because of variables such as the study design, the number of animals used, their diet, the differences in Candida strains, and the duration of the studies. These variables notwithstanding, the following could be concluded. (i) The primate model is ideal for investigating Candida-associated denture stomatitis since both erythematous and pseudomembranous lesions have been produced in monkey with prosthetic plates; they are, however, expensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. (ii) The rat model (both Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) is well proven for observing chronic oral candidal colonization and infection, due to the ease of breeding and handling and their ready availability. (iii) Mice are similar, but in addition there are well characterized variants simulating immunologic and genetic abnormalities (e.g., athymic, euthymic, murine-acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficient models) and hence are used for short-term studies relating the host immune response and oral environment in ecological and microbiological terms is yet to be described. Until such a model is developed, researchers should pay attention to standardization of the experimental protocols described here to obtain broadly comparable and meaningful data.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48930
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 16.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.741
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:29:57Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:29:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Microbiology Reviews, 2001, v. 14 n. 2, p. 398-429en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0893-8512en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48930-
dc.description.abstractOral candidiasis is as much the final outcome of the vulnerability of the host as of the virulence of the invading organism. We review here the extensive literature on animal experiments mainly appertaining to the host predisposing factors that initiate and perpetuate these infections. The monkey, rat, and mouse are the choice models for investigating oral candidiasis, but comparisons between the same or different models appear difficult, because of variables such as the study design, the number of animals used, their diet, the differences in Candida strains, and the duration of the studies. These variables notwithstanding, the following could be concluded. (i) The primate model is ideal for investigating Candida-associated denture stomatitis since both erythematous and pseudomembranous lesions have been produced in monkey with prosthetic plates; they are, however, expensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. (ii) The rat model (both Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) is well proven for observing chronic oral candidal colonization and infection, due to the ease of breeding and handling and their ready availability. (iii) Mice are similar, but in addition there are well characterized variants simulating immunologic and genetic abnormalities (e.g., athymic, euthymic, murine-acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficient models) and hence are used for short-term studies relating the host immune response and oral environment in ecological and microbiological terms is yet to be described. Until such a model is developed, researchers should pay attention to standardization of the experimental protocols described here to obtain broadly comparable and meaningful data.en_HK
dc.format.extent384 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Microbiology Reviewsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsClinical Microbiology Reviews. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 2001, v. 14 n. 2, p. 398-429en_HK
dc.subject.meshCandida - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCricetinaeen_HK
dc.titleExperimental oral candidiasis in animal modelsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0893-8512&volume=14&issue=2&spage=398&epage=429&date=2001&atitle=Experimental+oral+candidiasis+in+animal+modelsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH:hema@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/CMR.14.2.398-429.2001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11292645-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC88981en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035075604en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros56953-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035075604&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage398en_HK
dc.identifier.epage429en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000168047600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, YH=6602677237en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK

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