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Article: The influence of analogy learning on decision-making in table tennis: Evidence from behavioural data

TitleThe influence of analogy learning on decision-making in table tennis: Evidence from behavioural data
Authors
KeywordsAnalogy learning
Decision making
Declarative knowledge
Implicit motor learning
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2006, v. 7 n. 6, p. 677-688 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: In sports it may be necessary for a performer to make a decision and execute a movement in close succession, or even concurrently. The manner in which a movement is controlled may impact on the degree to which the performer is able to combine decisions and movements effectively. Previous work has shown that if control of the movement has been acquired explicitly, with a high declarative knowledge content, dual-task conditions can be disruptive to performance of the movement. Previous work has also shown that, in contrast, if movement control is acquired by analogical instruction, with a low declarative knowledge content, motor performance is unaffected by dual-task conditions. It was, therefore, hypothesised that analogy learning will reduce the performance cost associated with processing motor responses while making high-complexity decisions. Methods: Participants learnt to hit a table tennis topspin forehand using either a single analogical instruction or a set of written instructions (explicit learning). Motor performance was assessed when decisions about the direction in which to hit the ball were either low in complexity or high in complexity. Results: Low-complexity decisions had no effect on motor performance in either condition. However, high-complexity decisions caused a relative performance deterioration in the Explicit condition, but not in the Analogy condition. Conclusions: These findings extend the implicit motor learning literature by highlighting the role of analogy learning in the complex interaction between decision-making and movement control in sport. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48695
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:21:41Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:21:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2006, v. 7 n. 6, p. 677-688en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48695-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: In sports it may be necessary for a performer to make a decision and execute a movement in close succession, or even concurrently. The manner in which a movement is controlled may impact on the degree to which the performer is able to combine decisions and movements effectively. Previous work has shown that if control of the movement has been acquired explicitly, with a high declarative knowledge content, dual-task conditions can be disruptive to performance of the movement. Previous work has also shown that, in contrast, if movement control is acquired by analogical instruction, with a low declarative knowledge content, motor performance is unaffected by dual-task conditions. It was, therefore, hypothesised that analogy learning will reduce the performance cost associated with processing motor responses while making high-complexity decisions. Methods: Participants learnt to hit a table tennis topspin forehand using either a single analogical instruction or a set of written instructions (explicit learning). Motor performance was assessed when decisions about the direction in which to hit the ball were either low in complexity or high in complexity. Results: Low-complexity decisions had no effect on motor performance in either condition. However, high-complexity decisions caused a relative performance deterioration in the Explicit condition, but not in the Analogy condition. Conclusions: These findings extend the implicit motor learning literature by highlighting the role of analogy learning in the complex interaction between decision-making and movement control in sport. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.format.extent162558 bytes-
dc.format.extent28160 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsporten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsPsychology of Sport and Exercise. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectAnalogy learningen_HK
dc.subjectDecision makingen_HK
dc.subjectDeclarative knowledgeen_HK
dc.subjectImplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.titleThe influence of analogy learning on decision-making in table tennis: Evidence from behavioural dataen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1469-0292&volume=7&issue=6&spage=677&epage=688&date=2006&atitle=The+influence+of+analogy+learning+on+decision-making+in+table+tennis:+Evidence+from+behavioural+dataen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2006.03.005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748948576en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros128605-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748948576&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage677en_HK
dc.identifier.epage688en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241925700009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoolton, JM=8921750800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaxwell, JP=7201610565en_HK

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