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Article: Assessing children's emotional responses to surgery: A multidimensional approach

TitleAssessing children's emotional responses to surgery: A multidimensional approach
Authors
KeywordsAssessment
Behaviour
Children
Emotions
Psychological upset
Surgery
Issue Date2006
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 2006, v. 53 n. 5, p. 543-550 How to Cite?
AbstractAim. This paper reports a study to assess the interrelationships between physiological measures of children's heart rates and blood pressure, subjective measures of children's level of anxiety, and direct behavioural observations in children's emotional responses to surgery. Background. Psychological upset has been described as a multidimensional phenomenon which includes behavioural, subjective, and physiological components. However, a majority of previous studies have employed only one or two measures of psychological upset. Most importantly, the interrelationships among these three components of psychological upset have seldom been explored. Methods. A cross-sectional design was employed, and 106 Chinese children admitted for day surgery during the summer of 2004 were invited to participate in the study. They were asked to respond to the Chinese version of the State Anxiety Scale for Children. Their mean arterial blood pressure and heart rates were recorded in the operating theatre after being transferred to the operating table but before anaesthesia induction. A research nurse used the Children's Emotional Manifestation Scale to document the children's emotional behaviours during anaesthesia induction. The data were collected in 2004. Results. Children with high preoperative anxiety levels manifested more negative emotional behaviour during anaesthesia induction. Those with more negative emotional behaviour or high levels of state anxiety also had faster heart rates and higher mean arterial blood pressure. Conclusion. A child's response to stressful medical procedures can be varied. The emotional responses of children to surgery need to be understood as a multidimensional phenomenon. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of surgery on children, it is recommended that assessment strategies used should reflect the multidimensional phenomenon of the emotional upset. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48646
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, HCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:19:58Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:19:58Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Advanced Nursing, 2006, v. 53 n. 5, p. 543-550en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48646-
dc.description.abstractAim. This paper reports a study to assess the interrelationships between physiological measures of children's heart rates and blood pressure, subjective measures of children's level of anxiety, and direct behavioural observations in children's emotional responses to surgery. Background. Psychological upset has been described as a multidimensional phenomenon which includes behavioural, subjective, and physiological components. However, a majority of previous studies have employed only one or two measures of psychological upset. Most importantly, the interrelationships among these three components of psychological upset have seldom been explored. Methods. A cross-sectional design was employed, and 106 Chinese children admitted for day surgery during the summer of 2004 were invited to participate in the study. They were asked to respond to the Chinese version of the State Anxiety Scale for Children. Their mean arterial blood pressure and heart rates were recorded in the operating theatre after being transferred to the operating table but before anaesthesia induction. A research nurse used the Children's Emotional Manifestation Scale to document the children's emotional behaviours during anaesthesia induction. The data were collected in 2004. Results. Children with high preoperative anxiety levels manifested more negative emotional behaviour during anaesthesia induction. Those with more negative emotional behaviour or high levels of state anxiety also had faster heart rates and higher mean arterial blood pressure. Conclusion. A child's response to stressful medical procedures can be varied. The emotional responses of children to surgery need to be understood as a multidimensional phenomenon. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of surgery on children, it is recommended that assessment strategies used should reflect the multidimensional phenomenon of the emotional upset. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.format.extent69415 bytes-
dc.format.extent26112 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Advanced Nursing. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subjectAssessmenten_HK
dc.subjectBehaviouren_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectEmotionsen_HK
dc.subjectPsychological upseten_HK
dc.subjectSurgeryen_HK
dc.titleAssessing children's emotional responses to surgery: A multidimensional approachen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0309-2402&volume=53&issue=5&spage=543&epage=550&date=2006&atitle=Assessing+children%27s+emotional+responses+to+surgery:+a+multidimensional+approachen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, HCW: william3@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, HCW=rp00528en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2006.03756.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16499675-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645114485en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126097-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645114485&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage543en_HK
dc.identifier.epage550en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236244800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, HCW=8973660200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLopez, V=7103022537en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike521915-

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