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Article: Natural regeneration in exotic tree plantations in Hong Kong, China

TitleNatural regeneration in exotic tree plantations in Hong Kong, China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Hong Kong
Natural regeneration
Plantations
Succession
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foreco
Citation
Forest Ecology And Management, 2005, v. 212 n. 1-3, p. 358-366 How to Cite?
AbstractTree plantations consisting mostly of a single exotic species have been established in Hong Kong, South China, for reforesting degraded lands since the 1950s. In this study, natural woody plant regeneration success under different types of closed-canopy plantations (Acacia confusa, Lophostemon confertus, Melaleuca quinquenervia and mixed-plantings) and natural secondary forests in the central New Territories were assessed. A total of 79 tree species, 64 shrubs and 23 woody climbers were recorded in 16 20 m × 20 m plantation plots. Stem density of woody plant regeneration was similar among all sites, ranging from 9031 to 10,950 stems > 0.5 m in height per hectare. Multivariate analysis of understorey species composition showed that there were consistent differences between plantation types. Lophostemon plantations generally had poor native plant colonization in comparison with natural secondary forests and other types of plantations. These differences between forest types can be at least partly attributed to pre-existing site conditions, since the tree species planted were matched to the site. Native woody plant colonization was poor on sites isolated from natural seed sources. Plantation understories were generally dominated by a few species of bird-dispersed shrubs, suggesting that enrichment planting with poorly dispersed shade-tolerant native tree species will be needed to facilitate regeneration in those plantations where natural regeneration is inadequate. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48582
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.826
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.749
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, EWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHau, BCHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, RTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:17:54Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:17:54Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationForest Ecology And Management, 2005, v. 212 n. 1-3, p. 358-366en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-1127en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48582-
dc.description.abstractTree plantations consisting mostly of a single exotic species have been established in Hong Kong, South China, for reforesting degraded lands since the 1950s. In this study, natural woody plant regeneration success under different types of closed-canopy plantations (Acacia confusa, Lophostemon confertus, Melaleuca quinquenervia and mixed-plantings) and natural secondary forests in the central New Territories were assessed. A total of 79 tree species, 64 shrubs and 23 woody climbers were recorded in 16 20 m × 20 m plantation plots. Stem density of woody plant regeneration was similar among all sites, ranging from 9031 to 10,950 stems > 0.5 m in height per hectare. Multivariate analysis of understorey species composition showed that there were consistent differences between plantation types. Lophostemon plantations generally had poor native plant colonization in comparison with natural secondary forests and other types of plantations. These differences between forest types can be at least partly attributed to pre-existing site conditions, since the tree species planted were matched to the site. Native woody plant colonization was poor on sites isolated from natural seed sources. Plantation understories were generally dominated by a few species of bird-dispersed shrubs, suggesting that enrichment planting with poorly dispersed shade-tolerant native tree species will be needed to facilitate regeneration in those plantations where natural regeneration is inadequate. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
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dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
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dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
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dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forecoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofForest Ecology and Managementen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsForest Ecology and Management. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectNatural regenerationen_HK
dc.subjectPlantationsen_HK
dc.subjectSuccessionen_HK
dc.titleNatural regeneration in exotic tree plantations in Hong Kong, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0378-1127&volume=212&issue=1-3&spage=358&epage=366&date=2005&atitle=Natural+regeneration+in+exotic+tree+plantations+in+Hong+Kong,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHau, BCH: chhau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHau, BCH=rp00703en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foreco.2005.03.057en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20444378167en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros101219-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20444378167&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume212en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage358en_HK
dc.identifier.epage366en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229876300031-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, EWS=8578344000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHau, BCH=6701358580en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorlett, RT=7005765422en_HK

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