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Article: Effects of Tai Chi and resistance training on cardiovascular risk factors in elderly Chinese subjects: A 12-month longitudinal, randomized, controlled intervention study

TitleEffects of Tai Chi and resistance training on cardiovascular risk factors in elderly Chinese subjects: A 12-month longitudinal, randomized, controlled intervention study
Authors
KeywordsAgeing
Blood pressure
Lipids
Metabolic syndrome
Tai chi
Issue Date2005
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2005, v. 63 n. 6, p. 663-669 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Tai Chi is rapidly gaining in popularity, worldwide. This study was performed to assess its impact on cardiovascular risk factors in comparison with resistance training exercises in elderly Chinese subjects. Methods: A total of 207 healthy elderly participants (65-74 years, 113/207 (55%) men) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: (1) Tai Chi, three times/week for 1 h/session (n = 64); (2) resistance training exercise, three times/week for 1 h/session (n = 65); (3) usual level of physical activity control group (n = 78). Anthropometric measures, dual X-ray densitometry body composition, blood pressure, lipids, glycaemic and insulin sensitivity indices were measured at baseline and 12 months. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the between-group changes using a last-observation-carried-forward intention-to-treat approach. Results: A total of 180 (87.0%) subjects completed the study. No significant changes were identified in the Tai Chi group compared to the resistance training or control group. Of the primary outcomes, only the improvement in the insulin sensitivity index differed, being significantly greater in the resistance training than in the control group [mean difference 0.018 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.000-0.037) mmol glucose/min, P = 0.02), and tending to be greater than in the Tai Chi group (mean difference 0.019 (95% CI 0.000-0.038) mmol glucose/min, P < 0.06). Conclusion: Tai Chi had no significant effect on any measure compared to the controls, whereas resistance training improved the insulin sensitivity index in this 12-month study. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48551
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHong, AWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSanderson, JEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:16:57Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:16:57Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2005, v. 63 n. 6, p. 663-669en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48551-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Tai Chi is rapidly gaining in popularity, worldwide. This study was performed to assess its impact on cardiovascular risk factors in comparison with resistance training exercises in elderly Chinese subjects. Methods: A total of 207 healthy elderly participants (65-74 years, 113/207 (55%) men) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: (1) Tai Chi, three times/week for 1 h/session (n = 64); (2) resistance training exercise, three times/week for 1 h/session (n = 65); (3) usual level of physical activity control group (n = 78). Anthropometric measures, dual X-ray densitometry body composition, blood pressure, lipids, glycaemic and insulin sensitivity indices were measured at baseline and 12 months. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the between-group changes using a last-observation-carried-forward intention-to-treat approach. Results: A total of 180 (87.0%) subjects completed the study. No significant changes were identified in the Tai Chi group compared to the resistance training or control group. Of the primary outcomes, only the improvement in the insulin sensitivity index differed, being significantly greater in the resistance training than in the control group [mean difference 0.018 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.000-0.037) mmol glucose/min, P = 0.02), and tending to be greater than in the Tai Chi group (mean difference 0.019 (95% CI 0.000-0.038) mmol glucose/min, P < 0.06). Conclusion: Tai Chi had no significant effect on any measure compared to the controls, whereas resistance training improved the insulin sensitivity index in this 12-month study. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.format.extent137541 bytes-
dc.format.extent2502 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Endocrinology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subjectAgeingen_HK
dc.subjectBlood pressureen_HK
dc.subjectLipidsen_HK
dc.subjectMetabolic syndromeen_HK
dc.subjectTai chien_HK
dc.titleEffects of Tai Chi and resistance training on cardiovascular risk factors in elderly Chinese subjects: A 12-month longitudinal, randomized, controlled intervention studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-0664&volume=63&issue=6&spage=663&epage=669&date=2005&atitle=Effects+of+Tai+Chi+and+resistance+training+on+cardiovascular+risk+factors+in+elderly+Chinese+subjects:+a+12-month+longitudinal,+ranodmized,+controlled+intervention+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHong, AWL: athenawl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHong, AWL=rp00255en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2005.02398.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16343101-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-28844433266en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-28844433266&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume63en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage663en_HK
dc.identifier.epage669en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233569100010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHong, AWL=8687147500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTomlinson, B=16423466900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, E=7103086055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CWK=8531362100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSanderson, JE=7202371250en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike416030-

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