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Article: Ciliary central microtubular orientation is of no clinical significance in bronchiectasis

TitleCiliary central microtubular orientation is of no clinical significance in bronchiectasis
Authors
KeywordsBronchiectasis
Cilia
Ciliary central microtubular orientation
Transmission electronic microscopy
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed
Citation
Respiratory Medicine, 2005, v. 99 n. 3, p. 290-297 How to Cite?
Abstract
It has been suggested that patients with bronchiectasis might have increased central microtubular orientation angle (CMOA), which leads to poor coordination of ciliary beating, and consequently impairment of airway defence. We have employed transmission electron microscopy to assess CMOA of ciliated nasal mucosa in a cohort of 133 (81F, 56.8±16.1 yr) stable bronchiectasis and 59 healthy subjects (30F, 49.3±22.1 yr). There was no significant difference in CMOA between bronchiectasis (13.2 degree) and control subjects (13.0 degree, P = 0.82). There was no significant difference in CMOA among patients according to the etiology of bronchiectasis, presence of nasal symptoms, or sputum status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Patients with more severe bronchiectasis, i.e. those with FEV 1 <60%, FVC <60%, or more than 4 bronchiectatic lung lobes, had significantly lower CMOA than their counterparts (P < 0.05). There was no correlation between CMOA with age, 24 h sputum volume, exacerbation frequency, FEV 1, FVC, or the number of bronchiectatic lung lobes (P > 0.05). CMOA correlated with ciliary beat frequency (negative), and the percent of cilia showing ultrastructural or microtubular defects (P < 0.05). Central microtubular orientation angle does not correlate with clinically important parameters, in contrary to the results reported by previously published smaller scale studies. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48498
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.917
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Leicester
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTipoe, GLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMedStat, CKMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRutman, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, WKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:15:20Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:15:20Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory Medicine, 2005, v. 99 n. 3, p. 290-297en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0954-6111en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48498-
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested that patients with bronchiectasis might have increased central microtubular orientation angle (CMOA), which leads to poor coordination of ciliary beating, and consequently impairment of airway defence. We have employed transmission electron microscopy to assess CMOA of ciliated nasal mucosa in a cohort of 133 (81F, 56.8±16.1 yr) stable bronchiectasis and 59 healthy subjects (30F, 49.3±22.1 yr). There was no significant difference in CMOA between bronchiectasis (13.2 degree) and control subjects (13.0 degree, P = 0.82). There was no significant difference in CMOA among patients according to the etiology of bronchiectasis, presence of nasal symptoms, or sputum status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Patients with more severe bronchiectasis, i.e. those with FEV 1 <60%, FVC <60%, or more than 4 bronchiectatic lung lobes, had significantly lower CMOA than their counterparts (P < 0.05). There was no correlation between CMOA with age, 24 h sputum volume, exacerbation frequency, FEV 1, FVC, or the number of bronchiectatic lung lobes (P > 0.05). CMOA correlated with ciliary beat frequency (negative), and the percent of cilia showing ultrastructural or microtubular defects (P < 0.05). Central microtubular orientation angle does not correlate with clinically important parameters, in contrary to the results reported by previously published smaller scale studies. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
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dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRespiratory Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBronchiectasisen_HK
dc.subjectCiliaen_HK
dc.subjectCiliary central microtubular orientationen_HK
dc.subjectTransmission electronic microscopyen_HK
dc.titleCiliary central microtubular orientation is of no clinical significance in bronchiectasisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0954-6111&volume=99&issue=3&spage=290&epage=297&date=2005&atitle=Ciliary+central+microtubular+orientation+is+of+no+clinical+significance+in+bronchiectasisen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTipoe, GL:tgeorge@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMak, JC:judymak@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, M:mwpik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, KC:kcbtan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, JC:jhocm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL:plho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTipoe, GL=rp00371en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMak, JC=rp00352en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, M=rp00348en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, KC=rp00402en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, JC=rp00258en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2004.08.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15733504en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20944433536en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97629-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20944433536&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume99en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage290en_HK
dc.identifier.epage297en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227296600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, KW=7201555024en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTipoe, GL=7003550610en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, JC=7103323094en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, J=7410371598en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, M=7403907887en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, R=7101876102en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, KC=8082703100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMedStat, CKM=36831785500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, JC=7402649981en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PL=7402211363en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRutman, A=7004395293en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WK=7203021937en_HK

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