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Article: City repositioning and competitiveness building in regional development: New development strategies in Guangzhou, China

TitleCity repositioning and competitiveness building in regional development: New development strategies in Guangzhou, China
Authors
KeywordsHousing and urban planning
Issue Date2005
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/IJURR
Citation
International Journal Of Urban And Regional Research, 2005, v. 29 n. 2, p. 283-308+222-223 How to Cite?
AbstractCompetition among cities for mobile capital in the twenty-first century has intensified. The urban hierarchy of regions is undergoing transformation, causing economic fortunes to vary markedly among different localities. In China, these global forces and regional restructuring have caused a relative economic decline in some historically powerful cities, and have also brought about the emergence of new economic centers. In response to these forces, many Chinese cities have been driven into adopting a series of new competitive strategies, which seek to win back and build up their leading positions and competitiveness. To translate these strategies into concrete actions, local governments have promoted high-profile and face-lifting projects and investments. The extensive new urban development in Guangzhou is a particularly interesting case. As the provincial capital of the Guangdong Province, and a historically central city in the Pearl River Delta region, Guangzhou's importance has recently declined. This article attempts to reveal the general strategies and specific projects initiated in Guangzhou as important promotion devices in its revitalization program, and to examine the rationales behind them. The ambitious new strategies are most likely to occur under the 'soft budget constraint' syndrome in China, and these strategies could be risky. Although the extent to which these strategies actually do stimulate business and lure investment is yet to be seen, the citizens are immediately and directly benefiting from them and consequently they have gained much popularity and support. However, the competitiveness building in Chinese cities has called into question the legitimacy of local state governance, and the validity of large projects that lack financial discipline, social objectives and accountability for unsuccessful investments. © Joint Editors and Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48496
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.868
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.267
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeh, AGOen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:15:14Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:15:14Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Urban And Regional Research, 2005, v. 29 n. 2, p. 283-308+222-223en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-1317en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48496-
dc.description.abstractCompetition among cities for mobile capital in the twenty-first century has intensified. The urban hierarchy of regions is undergoing transformation, causing economic fortunes to vary markedly among different localities. In China, these global forces and regional restructuring have caused a relative economic decline in some historically powerful cities, and have also brought about the emergence of new economic centers. In response to these forces, many Chinese cities have been driven into adopting a series of new competitive strategies, which seek to win back and build up their leading positions and competitiveness. To translate these strategies into concrete actions, local governments have promoted high-profile and face-lifting projects and investments. The extensive new urban development in Guangzhou is a particularly interesting case. As the provincial capital of the Guangdong Province, and a historically central city in the Pearl River Delta region, Guangzhou's importance has recently declined. This article attempts to reveal the general strategies and specific projects initiated in Guangzhou as important promotion devices in its revitalization program, and to examine the rationales behind them. The ambitious new strategies are most likely to occur under the 'soft budget constraint' syndrome in China, and these strategies could be risky. Although the extent to which these strategies actually do stimulate business and lure investment is yet to be seen, the citizens are immediately and directly benefiting from them and consequently they have gained much popularity and support. However, the competitiveness building in Chinese cities has called into question the legitimacy of local state governance, and the validity of large projects that lack financial discipline, social objectives and accountability for unsuccessful investments. © Joint Editors and Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2005.en_HK
dc.format.extent176774 bytes-
dc.format.extent96118 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/IJURRen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Urban and Regional Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Urban and Regional Research. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subjectHousing and urban planningen_HK
dc.titleCity repositioning and competitiveness building in regional development: New development strategies in Guangzhou, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0309-1317&volume=29&issue=2&spage=283&epage=308&date=2005&atitle=City+Repositioning+and+Competitiveness+Building+in+Regional+Development:+New+Development+Strategies+in+Guangzhouen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYeh, AGO: hdxugoy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYeh, AGO=rp01033en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2427.2005.00585.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27744578466en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros107737-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27744578466&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage283en_HK
dc.identifier.epage308+222en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231028300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, J=7407006576en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeh, AGO=7103069369en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike260246-

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