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Article: Three Ways of Going Wrong: Kipling, Conrad, Coetzee

TitleThree Ways of Going Wrong: Kipling, Conrad, Coetzee
Authors
KeywordsLiterature linguistics
Issue Date2000
PublisherManey Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.maney.co.uk/search?fwaction=show&fwid=190
Citation
Modern Language Review, 2000, v. 95 n. 1, p. 18-27 How to Cite?
AbstractThis investigation of the theme of 'going wrong' in colonial discourse examines two Indian stories from Rudyard Kipling's Plain Tales from the Hills, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. A myth of empire is identified in the transgressive figure of the man who jeopardizes his own people's identity and prestige by becoming too closely involved in 'native life', and on his relationship with a second, more law-abiding figure who forms a misgiving bond with him. It is argued that the tension and the kinship between these figures of law and transgression indicate a fault-line in the nature of empire itself.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48380
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.103

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKerr, DWFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T03:52:19Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T03:52:19Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationModern Language Review, 2000, v. 95 n. 1, p. 18-27en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0026-7937en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48380-
dc.description.abstractThis investigation of the theme of 'going wrong' in colonial discourse examines two Indian stories from Rudyard Kipling's Plain Tales from the Hills, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians. A myth of empire is identified in the transgressive figure of the man who jeopardizes his own people's identity and prestige by becoming too closely involved in 'native life', and on his relationship with a second, more law-abiding figure who forms a misgiving bond with him. It is argued that the tension and the kinship between these figures of law and transgression indicate a fault-line in the nature of empire itself.en_HK
dc.format.extent43859 bytes-
dc.format.extent28672 bytes-
dc.format.extent413 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherManey Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.maney.co.uk/search?fwaction=show&fwid=190en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLiterature linguisticsen_HK
dc.titleThree Ways of Going Wrong: Kipling, Conrad, Coetzeeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0026-7937&volume=95&issue=1&spage=18&epage=27&date=2000&atitle=Three+Ways+of+Going+Wrong:+Kipling,+Conrad,+Coetzeeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKerr, DWF: kerrdw@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros52104-

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