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Conference Paper: Fabricators, industry and academia: the technology transfer challenge

TitleFabricators, industry and academia: the technology transfer challenge
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000354
Citation
IEEE International Symposium on Industrial Electronics Proceedings, Guimaraes, Portugal, 7-11 July 1997, v. 1, p. SS193-SS196 How to Cite?
AbstractAutomated fabrication is a cornerstone of the revolution in manufacturing technology. The ever-increasing number of machines and the widening variety of applications both state that the technology is here to stay. But, there are still many lessons to be learnt before we are faced with a mature, stable and fully integrated technology. Industry uses automated fabricators to gain a market advantage. Eventually they will be used in order to avoid being left behind. The role of academia is to guide industry through these developmental stages and to ensure the transition to maturity is smooth. It is important to analyse the roles of industry and academia in supporting this new technology. There are a number of strategies for gaining industrial acceptance and the experience of the University of Hong Kong and other institutions in Hong Kong, in liaison with local industry, may help future technology transfer programmes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/46644

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Ien_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:54:56Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:54:56Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIEEE International Symposium on Industrial Electronics Proceedings, Guimaraes, Portugal, 7-11 July 1997, v. 1, p. SS193-SS196en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/46644-
dc.description.abstractAutomated fabrication is a cornerstone of the revolution in manufacturing technology. The ever-increasing number of machines and the widening variety of applications both state that the technology is here to stay. But, there are still many lessons to be learnt before we are faced with a mature, stable and fully integrated technology. Industry uses automated fabricators to gain a market advantage. Eventually they will be used in order to avoid being left behind. The role of academia is to guide industry through these developmental stages and to ensure the transition to maturity is smooth. It is important to analyse the roles of industry and academia in supporting this new technology. There are a number of strategies for gaining industrial acceptance and the experience of the University of Hong Kong and other institutions in Hong Kong, in liaison with local industry, may help future technology transfer programmes.en_HK
dc.format.extent497015 bytes-
dc.format.extent2198 bytes-
dc.format.extent2667 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000354en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rights©1997 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.en_HK
dc.titleFabricators, industry and academia: the technology transfer challengeen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ISIE.1997.651760en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros32487-

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