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Conference Paper: Inter-domain router placement and traffic engineering

TitleInter-domain router placement and traffic engineering
Authors
KeywordsCommunications
Issue Date2002
PublisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000104
Citation
Ieee International Conference On Communications, 2002, v. 4, p. 2443-2448 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Internet is organized as an interconnection of separate administrative domains called Autonomous Systems (AS). The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is the de facto standard for controlling the routing of traffic across different ASs. It supports scalable distribution of reachability and routing policy information among different ASs. In this paper, we study a network design problem which determines (1) the optimal placement of border router(s) within a domain and (2) the corresponding inter-and intra-domain traffic patterns within an AS. Practical constraints imposed by BGP and other standard shortest-path-based intra-domain routing protocols are considered. The problem is formulated as a variant of the uncapacitated network design problem (UNDP). While it is feasible to use a brute-force, integer-programming-based approach for tackling small instances of this problem, we have resorted to a dual-ascent approximation approach for mid/large-scale instances. The quality of the approximation approach is evaluated in terms of its computational efficiency and network cost sub-optimality. Sensitivity analysis w.r.t. various network/traffic parameters are also conducted. We then describe how one can apply our optimization results to better configure BGP as well as other intra-domain routing protocols. This serves as a first-step towards the auto-configuration of Internet routing protocols, BGP in particular, which is "well-known" for its tedious and error-prone configuration needs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/46300
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, VOKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:46:49Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:46:49Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIeee International Conference On Communications, 2002, v. 4, p. 2443-2448en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0536-1486en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/46300-
dc.description.abstractThe Internet is organized as an interconnection of separate administrative domains called Autonomous Systems (AS). The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is the de facto standard for controlling the routing of traffic across different ASs. It supports scalable distribution of reachability and routing policy information among different ASs. In this paper, we study a network design problem which determines (1) the optimal placement of border router(s) within a domain and (2) the corresponding inter-and intra-domain traffic patterns within an AS. Practical constraints imposed by BGP and other standard shortest-path-based intra-domain routing protocols are considered. The problem is formulated as a variant of the uncapacitated network design problem (UNDP). While it is feasible to use a brute-force, integer-programming-based approach for tackling small instances of this problem, we have resorted to a dual-ascent approximation approach for mid/large-scale instances. The quality of the approximation approach is evaluated in terms of its computational efficiency and network cost sub-optimality. Sensitivity analysis w.r.t. various network/traffic parameters are also conducted. We then describe how one can apply our optimization results to better configure BGP as well as other intra-domain routing protocols. This serves as a first-step towards the auto-configuration of Internet routing protocols, BGP in particular, which is "well-known" for its tedious and error-prone configuration needs.en_HK
dc.format.extent268010 bytes-
dc.format.extent4152649 bytes-
dc.format.extent2590 bytes-
dc.format.extent23319 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000104en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE International Conference on Communicationsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rights©2002 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.en_HK
dc.subjectCommunicationsen_HK
dc.titleInter-domain router placement and traffic engineeringen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1044-4556&volume=4&spage=2443&epage=2448&date=2002&atitle=Inter-domain+router+placement+and+traffic+engineeringen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, VOK:vli@eee.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, VOK=rp00150en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ICC.2002.997282en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036279862en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros70633-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036279862&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2443en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2448en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, F=37004112100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, WC=7402933201en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, VOK=7202621685en_HK

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