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Conference Paper: PCS: regulation and markets

TitlePCS: regulation and markets
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherIEEE.
Citation
IEEE - P C S Symposium, Hong Kong, China, 7 June 1995, p. 1-13 How to Cite?
AbstractWireless personal communications technologies are about to enter their second decisive stage of development. Stage one was incremental, supplementing wireline communications networks. Stage two is radical, offering both synergy and substitution, and heralds a third, revolutionary stage in which all that is fixed becomes mobile. Stage two will be one of transition from an environment of limited bandwidths and small but rapidly growing markets, to a world of re-usable and re-assignable spectrum interconnecting with broadband networks for a mass market. Regulating the transition is a controversial process. Spectrum is regarded as a scarce resource which requires careful management in the public interest, yet Hong Kong policy moves in the direction of market solutions. The regulator is therefore required to perform a balancing act between the interests of different parties: the existingwireline and wireless operators, the new entrants, future new entrants, existing customers and future customers, and Hong Kong’s reputation as a progressive free market.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45632

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorUre, JCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:30:46Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:30:46Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIEEE - P C S Symposium, Hong Kong, China, 7 June 1995, p. 1-13en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45632-
dc.description.abstractWireless personal communications technologies are about to enter their second decisive stage of development. Stage one was incremental, supplementing wireline communications networks. Stage two is radical, offering both synergy and substitution, and heralds a third, revolutionary stage in which all that is fixed becomes mobile. Stage two will be one of transition from an environment of limited bandwidths and small but rapidly growing markets, to a world of re-usable and re-assignable spectrum interconnecting with broadband networks for a mass market. Regulating the transition is a controversial process. Spectrum is regarded as a scarce resource which requires careful management in the public interest, yet Hong Kong policy moves in the direction of market solutions. The regulator is therefore required to perform a balancing act between the interests of different parties: the existingwireline and wireless operators, the new entrants, future new entrants, existing customers and future customers, and Hong Kong’s reputation as a progressive free market.en_HK
dc.format.extent56932 bytes-
dc.format.extent2143 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE.en_HK
dc.rights©1995 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePCS: regulation and marketsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros11722-

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