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Conference Paper: Human agents and intelligent agents: an experiment on the Internet

TitleHuman agents and intelligent agents: an experiment on the Internet
Authors
KeywordsComputers
Computer systems
Issue Date1997
PublisherIEEE, Computer Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://csdl2.computer.org/persagen/DLPublication.jsp?pubtype=p&acronym=HICSS
Citation
The 30th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences Proceedings, Wailea, Hawaii, 7-10 January 1997, v. 4, p. 242-252 How to Cite?
AbstractTo understand the strengths and limitations of software agents is very important. Many issues and limitations have been discussed in the literature, for example, software agents have limited learning capability. However, if we could see such limitations in a controlled environment and measure how such limitations affect the agents' performance, such research can be extremely helpful to design better software agents. We developed an artificial market with networked computers to simulate the environment of the Internet. This artificial market allows players, such as, humans or software agents, to compete in a simulated dynamic market. We conducted two sets of experiments to study the limitations of software agents. The first set of five experiments were used to identify the knowledge or strategies that human subjects applied in competition. We classified the knowledge or strategies into four levels: perception, uses of simple model and heuristics, application of long-term strategies and psychological tactics, and prediction or forecasting. The second set of five experiments studied how much humans can transfer their knowledge to the software agents. In all the experiments, subjects received monetay rewards From the statistical analysis of the decisions of humans and software agents, we have identified several limitations to the software agents. For example, some subjects used veiy complicated strategies and psychological tactics in earning high profits. However, they could not transfer such knowledge to the software agents. From interviews and questionnaires we confirmed such findings. Based on these Jindings, we conclude that software agents are suitable for wellstructured and repeating tasks and not suitable for critical and high-risk task, such as, investment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45579
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYen, JCHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:29:37Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:29:37Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 30th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences Proceedings, Wailea, Hawaii, 7-10 January 1997, v. 4, p. 242-252en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1060-3425en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45579-
dc.description.abstractTo understand the strengths and limitations of software agents is very important. Many issues and limitations have been discussed in the literature, for example, software agents have limited learning capability. However, if we could see such limitations in a controlled environment and measure how such limitations affect the agents' performance, such research can be extremely helpful to design better software agents. We developed an artificial market with networked computers to simulate the environment of the Internet. This artificial market allows players, such as, humans or software agents, to compete in a simulated dynamic market. We conducted two sets of experiments to study the limitations of software agents. The first set of five experiments were used to identify the knowledge or strategies that human subjects applied in competition. We classified the knowledge or strategies into four levels: perception, uses of simple model and heuristics, application of long-term strategies and psychological tactics, and prediction or forecasting. The second set of five experiments studied how much humans can transfer their knowledge to the software agents. In all the experiments, subjects received monetay rewards From the statistical analysis of the decisions of humans and software agents, we have identified several limitations to the software agents. For example, some subjects used veiy complicated strategies and psychological tactics in earning high profits. However, they could not transfer such knowledge to the software agents. From interviews and questionnaires we confirmed such findings. Based on these Jindings, we conclude that software agents are suitable for wellstructured and repeating tasks and not suitable for critical and high-risk task, such as, investment.en_HK
dc.format.extent1311471 bytes-
dc.format.extent3193 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE, Computer Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://csdl2.computer.org/persagen/DLPublication.jsp?pubtype=p&acronym=HICSSen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rights©1997 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.en_HK
dc.subjectComputersen_HK
dc.subjectComputer systemsen_HK
dc.titleHuman agents and intelligent agents: an experiment on the Interneten_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1060-3425&volume=4&spage=242&epage=252&date=1997&atitle=Human+agents+and+intelligent+agents:+an+experiment+on+the+Interneten_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/HICSS.1997.663395en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros27841-

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