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Article: Longer term follow up of aerobic capacity in children affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
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TitleLonger term follow up of aerobic capacity in children affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
 
AuthorsYu, CCW8 2
Li, AM5 8
So, RCH1
McManus, A2
Ng, PC8
Chu, W8
Chan, D8
Cheng, F8
Chiu, WK7
Leung, CW3
Yau, YS4
Mo, KW6
Wong, EMC5
Cheung, AYK5
Leung, TF8
Sung, RYT8
Fok, TF8
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationThorax, 2006, v. 61 n. 3, p. 240-246 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.2005.046854
 
AbstractBackground: A study was undertaken to investigate the aerobic capacity and pulmonary function of children 6 and 15 months after the diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: Thirty four patients of mean age 14.7 years completed both pulmonary function and maximal aerobic capacity tests at 6 months. All had normal clinical examination and were asymptomatic. Their exercise responses were compared with a group of healthy controls. Complete data were collected on 27 of the original 34 cases at 15 months. Results: Compared with normal controls, the patient group had significantly lower absolute and mass related peak oxygen consumption (peak V̇O 2 (p<0.01)), higher ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (p<0.01), lower oxygen pulse (p<0.01), and a lower oxygen uptake efficiency slope (p<0.01) at 6 months. This impairment was unexpected and out of proportion with the degree of lung function abnormality. Residual high resolution computed tomography of thorax (HRCT) abnormalities were present in 14 patients. Those with abnormal HRCT findings had significantly lower mass related peak V̇O 2 than subjects with normal radiology (p<0.01). Absolute and mass related peak V̇O 2 in the patient group remained impaired at 15 months despite normalisation of lung function in all patients. Conclusions: The mechanism for the reduced aerobic capacity in children following SARS is not fully understood, but it is probably a consequence of impaired perfusion to the lungs at peak exercise and deconditioning.
 
ISSN0040-6376
2012 Impact Factor: 8.376
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.742
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.2005.046854
 
PubMed Central IDPMC2080724
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000235776700013
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYu, CCW
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, AM
 
dc.contributor.authorSo, RCH
 
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, A
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorChu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, D
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, F
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorYau, YS
 
dc.contributor.authorMo, KW
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, EMC
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, AYK
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, TF
 
dc.contributor.authorSung, RYT
 
dc.contributor.authorFok, TF
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:28:09Z
 
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:28:09Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: A study was undertaken to investigate the aerobic capacity and pulmonary function of children 6 and 15 months after the diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: Thirty four patients of mean age 14.7 years completed both pulmonary function and maximal aerobic capacity tests at 6 months. All had normal clinical examination and were asymptomatic. Their exercise responses were compared with a group of healthy controls. Complete data were collected on 27 of the original 34 cases at 15 months. Results: Compared with normal controls, the patient group had significantly lower absolute and mass related peak oxygen consumption (peak V̇O 2 (p<0.01)), higher ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (p<0.01), lower oxygen pulse (p<0.01), and a lower oxygen uptake efficiency slope (p<0.01) at 6 months. This impairment was unexpected and out of proportion with the degree of lung function abnormality. Residual high resolution computed tomography of thorax (HRCT) abnormalities were present in 14 patients. Those with abnormal HRCT findings had significantly lower mass related peak V̇O 2 than subjects with normal radiology (p<0.01). Absolute and mass related peak V̇O 2 in the patient group remained impaired at 15 months despite normalisation of lung function in all patients. Conclusions: The mechanism for the reduced aerobic capacity in children following SARS is not fully understood, but it is probably a consequence of impaired perfusion to the lungs at peak exercise and deconditioning.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent224494 bytes
 
dc.format.extent1788 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
 
dc.identifier.citationThorax, 2006, v. 61 n. 3, p. 240-246 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.2005.046854
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.2005.046854
 
dc.identifier.epage246
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235776700013
 
dc.identifier.issn0040-6376
2012 Impact Factor: 8.376
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.742
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2080724
 
dc.identifier.pmid16449271
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645056422
 
dc.identifier.spage240
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45520
 
dc.identifier.volume61
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofThorax
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThorax. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshExercise Tolerance - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumption - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Tests
 
dc.titleLonger term follow up of aerobic capacity in children affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Sports Institute
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Princess Margaret Hospital Hong Kong
  4. Queen Elizabeth Hospital Hong Kong
  5. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  6. Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital
  7. United Christian Hospital Hong Kong
  8. Chinese University of Hong Kong