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Article: An ecological study of trends in cancer incidence and dietary changes in Hong Kong

TitleAn ecological study of trends in cancer incidence and dietary changes in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.leaonline.com/loi/nc
Citation
Nutrition and Cancer, 1997, v. 28 n. 3, p. 289-301 How to Cite?
AbstractCancer incidence rates from the Hong Kong Cancer Registry show significant increases in lung and colon cancers and decreases in nasopharyngeal cancer in both sexes from 1973 to 1992. Moreover, cervical cancer and male esophageal cancer have declined significantly, and changes in the trends of cancer of the following sites were of borderline significance: decreasing male laryngeal and female esophageal cancers and increasing prostate and female breast cancers. These changes have occurred along with dietary shifts in the population, from a diet predominantly of rice and small portions of meat, vegetables, and fish to one with larger portions of all foods but rice and eggs. The latter data were gathered from six government household surveys from 1963-64 to 1994-95. By combining the two data sets, correlation coefficients were calculated for per capita consumption patterns of eight foods (rice, pork, beef, poultry, saltwater fish, freshwater fish, fresh vegetables, and eggs) and cancer incidence data of the same year or 10 years later. Higher meat intakes were significantly and positively correlated with cancers of the colon, rectum, prostate, and female breast. The correlations also suggested that current diets were more influential than diets a decade before for cancers of the lung, esophagus, rectum, and prostate. Cancers of the nasopharynx and colon were significantly correlated with current and past diets. These results support the hypothesis that intakes of meat and its associated fat are risk factors for colon, rectal, prostate, and female breast cancers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45472
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.241
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.931
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKoo, LCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMang, OWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, JHCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:26:46Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:26:46Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNutrition and Cancer, 1997, v. 28 n. 3, p. 289-301en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0163-5581en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45472-
dc.description.abstractCancer incidence rates from the Hong Kong Cancer Registry show significant increases in lung and colon cancers and decreases in nasopharyngeal cancer in both sexes from 1973 to 1992. Moreover, cervical cancer and male esophageal cancer have declined significantly, and changes in the trends of cancer of the following sites were of borderline significance: decreasing male laryngeal and female esophageal cancers and increasing prostate and female breast cancers. These changes have occurred along with dietary shifts in the population, from a diet predominantly of rice and small portions of meat, vegetables, and fish to one with larger portions of all foods but rice and eggs. The latter data were gathered from six government household surveys from 1963-64 to 1994-95. By combining the two data sets, correlation coefficients were calculated for per capita consumption patterns of eight foods (rice, pork, beef, poultry, saltwater fish, freshwater fish, fresh vegetables, and eggs) and cancer incidence data of the same year or 10 years later. Higher meat intakes were significantly and positively correlated with cancers of the colon, rectum, prostate, and female breast. The correlations also suggested that current diets were more influential than diets a decade before for cancers of the lung, esophagus, rectum, and prostate. Cancers of the nasopharynx and colon were significantly correlated with current and past diets. These results support the hypothesis that intakes of meat and its associated fat are risk factors for colon, rectal, prostate, and female breast cancers.en_HK
dc.format.extent822070 bytes-
dc.format.extent1974 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.leaonline.com/loi/ncen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsthe article is accepted for publication in Nutrition and Cancer. Readers must contact LEA for permission to reprint or use the material in any form.en_HK
dc.subject.meshDiet-trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleAn ecological study of trends in cancer incidence and dietary changes in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0163-5581&volume=28&issue=3&spage=289&epage=301&date=1997&atitle=An+ecological+study+of+trends+in+cancer+incidence+and+dietary+changes+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9343839-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030749014-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997YB00900011-

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