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Article: Surgical wound infection

TitleSurgical wound infection
Authors
KeywordsOperative
Postoperative complications
Risk factors
Surgical procedures
Surgical wound infection
Issue Date1999
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 1999, v. 5 n. 1, p. 82-86 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To review the risk factors for surgical would infection; the use of prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of wound infection; and the benefits of wound surveillance programmes to reduce the rate of surgical wound infection. Data sources. Medline literature search and review of published work on surgical wound infection, and the references cited in them. Study selection. Critical studies containing supporting evidence were selected. Data extraction. Data were extracted independently by multiple observers. Data synthesis. Factors that effect the susceptibility of a wound to infection include a pre-existing illness, the duration of the operative procedure, wound contamination, three or more diagnoses at the time of discharge, and abdominal operations. Antibiotic prophylaxis can decrease postoperative morbidity, shorten hospital stay, and reduce overall costs attributable to infection; the choice of antibiotic depends on the would class. Wound surveillance can also decrease wound infection rates. Conclusion. Surgical wound infections are common and consume a considerable portion of health care finances. A reduction in the infection rate to a minimal level, however, can be achieved by the judicious use of antibiotic prophylaxis and the use of an organised system of wound surveillance and reporting.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45397
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNandi, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSoundara Rajan, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, YPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:24:36Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:24:36Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 1999, v. 5 n. 1, p. 82-86en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45397-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To review the risk factors for surgical would infection; the use of prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of wound infection; and the benefits of wound surveillance programmes to reduce the rate of surgical wound infection. Data sources. Medline literature search and review of published work on surgical wound infection, and the references cited in them. Study selection. Critical studies containing supporting evidence were selected. Data extraction. Data were extracted independently by multiple observers. Data synthesis. Factors that effect the susceptibility of a wound to infection include a pre-existing illness, the duration of the operative procedure, wound contamination, three or more diagnoses at the time of discharge, and abdominal operations. Antibiotic prophylaxis can decrease postoperative morbidity, shorten hospital stay, and reduce overall costs attributable to infection; the choice of antibiotic depends on the would class. Wound surveillance can also decrease wound infection rates. Conclusion. Surgical wound infections are common and consume a considerable portion of health care finances. A reduction in the infection rate to a minimal level, however, can be achieved by the judicious use of antibiotic prophylaxis and the use of an organised system of wound surveillance and reporting.en_HK
dc.format.extent30062 bytes-
dc.format.extent1916 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectOperativeen_HK
dc.subjectPostoperative complicationsen_HK
dc.subjectRisk factorsen_HK
dc.subjectSurgical proceduresen_HK
dc.subjectSurgical wound infectionen_HK
dc.titleSurgical wound infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=5&issue=1&spage=82&epage=86&date=1999&atitle=Surgical+wound+infectionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SC: chanlsc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SC=rp01568en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11821574en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032984187en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros41023-
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage82en_HK
dc.identifier.epage86en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNandi, PL=7006014549en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSoundara Rajan, S=6505564844en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KC=51663738600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SC=7404255575en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, YP=7006794035en_HK

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