File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Socio-economic and psychological correlates of suicidality among Hong Kong working-age adults: Results from a population-based survey

TitleSocio-economic and psychological correlates of suicidality among Hong Kong working-age adults: Results from a population-based survey
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2006, v. 36 n. 12, p. 1759-1767 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. The global toll of suicide is estimated to be one million lives per year, which exceeded the number of deaths by homicide and war combined. A key step to suicide prevention is to prevent less serious suicidal behaviour to preclude more lethal outcomes. Although 61% of the world's suicides take place in Asia and the suicide rates among middle age groups have been increasing since the economic crisis in many Asian countries, population-based studies of suicidal behaviour among working-age adults in non-western communities are scarce. Method. Data from a population-based survey with 2015 participants were used to estimate the prevalence of suicidal ideation and behaviour among the working-age population in Hong Kong, and to study the associated socio-economic and psychological correlates. We focused particularly on potential modulating factors between life-event-related factors and suicidal ideation. Results. Six per cent of the Hong Kong population aged 20-59 years considered suicide in the past year, while 1.4% attempted suicide. Hopelessness, reasons for living, and reluctance to seek help from family and friends had direct association with past-year suicidal ideation. Reasons for living were found to moderate the effect of perceived stress on suicidal ideation. Conclusions. Suicidality is a multi-faceted problem that calls for a multi-sectored, multi-layered approach to prevention. Prevention programmes can work on modulating factors such as reasons for living to reduce suicidal risk in working-age adults. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45297
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, DTSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, YWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorConwell, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:22:10Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:22:10Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2006, v. 36 n. 12, p. 1759-1767en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45297-
dc.description.abstractBackground. The global toll of suicide is estimated to be one million lives per year, which exceeded the number of deaths by homicide and war combined. A key step to suicide prevention is to prevent less serious suicidal behaviour to preclude more lethal outcomes. Although 61% of the world's suicides take place in Asia and the suicide rates among middle age groups have been increasing since the economic crisis in many Asian countries, population-based studies of suicidal behaviour among working-age adults in non-western communities are scarce. Method. Data from a population-based survey with 2015 participants were used to estimate the prevalence of suicidal ideation and behaviour among the working-age population in Hong Kong, and to study the associated socio-economic and psychological correlates. We focused particularly on potential modulating factors between life-event-related factors and suicidal ideation. Results. Six per cent of the Hong Kong population aged 20-59 years considered suicide in the past year, while 1.4% attempted suicide. Hopelessness, reasons for living, and reluctance to seek help from family and friends had direct association with past-year suicidal ideation. Reasons for living were found to moderate the effect of perceived stress on suicidal ideation. Conclusions. Suicidality is a multi-faceted problem that calls for a multi-sectored, multi-layered approach to prevention. Prevention programmes can work on modulating factors such as reasons for living to reduce suicidal risk in working-age adults. © 2006 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.format.extent133607 bytes-
dc.format.extent2009 bytes-
dc.format.extent3474 bytes-
dc.format.extent2197 bytes-
dc.format.extent3382 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsPsychological Medicine. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSuicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.titleSocio-economic and psychological correlates of suicidality among Hong Kong working-age adults: Results from a population-based surveyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0033-2917&volume=36&issue=12&spage=1759&epage=67&date=2006&atitle=Socio-economic+and+psychological+correlates+of+suicidality+among+Hong+Kong+working-age+adults:+results+from+a+population-based+surveyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, YW: flawhk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, YW=rp00561en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291706009032en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17129396-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37849185114en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37849185114&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1759en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1767en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243764200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, KY=12238938300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EYH=7402315729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, DTS=15319214300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, YW=7006095381en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConwell, Y=7006293352en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats