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Article: Bacteraemia caused by Anaerotruncus colihominis and emended description of the species
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TitleBacteraemia caused by Anaerotruncus colihominis and emended description of the species
 
AuthorsLau, SKP1
Woo, PCY1
Woo, GKS1
Fung, AMY1
Ngan, AHY1
Song, Y3
Liu, C3
Summanen, P3
Finegold, SM2
Yuen, KY1
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2006, v. 59 n. 7, p. 748-752 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2005.031773
 
AbstractBackground: Anaerotruncus colihomonis is a newly described bacterial genus and species isolated from the stool specimens of children. Its clinical significance, however, is unknown. Aims: To describe a case of A colihominis bacteraemia identified by 165 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing and provide an emended description of the species. Methods: An unidentified anaerobic bacillus (strain HKU19) that stains Gram negative was subjected to characterisation by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, G+C content determination and electron microscopy. Results: Strain HKU19 was isolated from the blood culture of a 78-year-old woman with nosocomial bacteraemia. It was found to be an anaerobic, non-motile, pleomorphic, thin bacillus that stains Gram negative. It produces Indole and utilises glucose and mannose. Identifying the strain to the species level was not possible by conventional phenotypic tests and commercial identification systems. The G+C content of strain HKU19 was found to be 53.43 mol%. A similarity of 99.3% nucleotide identities was found between the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain HKU19 and that of A colihominis WAL 14 565T, which was isolated from a human faecal specimen. In contrast with the original description of A colihominis, HKU19 was found to produce occasional oval, terminal spores, although the other phenotypic characteristics matched. Spores were also occasionally observed when the two previously reported strains were re-examined. Conclusions: Although the source of the bacteraemia in the patient cannot be determined, this report suggests that A colihominis is of clinical significance. Spore formation is proposed as an emended description of A colihominis.
 
ISSN0021-9746
2013 Impact Factor: 2.551
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2005.031773
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1860411
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000238592900016
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, GKS
 
dc.contributor.authorFung, AMY
 
dc.contributor.authorNgan, AHY
 
dc.contributor.authorSong, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, C
 
dc.contributor.authorSummanen, P
 
dc.contributor.authorFinegold, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:18:58Z
 
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:18:58Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Anaerotruncus colihomonis is a newly described bacterial genus and species isolated from the stool specimens of children. Its clinical significance, however, is unknown. Aims: To describe a case of A colihominis bacteraemia identified by 165 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing and provide an emended description of the species. Methods: An unidentified anaerobic bacillus (strain HKU19) that stains Gram negative was subjected to characterisation by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, G+C content determination and electron microscopy. Results: Strain HKU19 was isolated from the blood culture of a 78-year-old woman with nosocomial bacteraemia. It was found to be an anaerobic, non-motile, pleomorphic, thin bacillus that stains Gram negative. It produces Indole and utilises glucose and mannose. Identifying the strain to the species level was not possible by conventional phenotypic tests and commercial identification systems. The G+C content of strain HKU19 was found to be 53.43 mol%. A similarity of 99.3% nucleotide identities was found between the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain HKU19 and that of A colihominis WAL 14 565T, which was isolated from a human faecal specimen. In contrast with the original description of A colihominis, HKU19 was found to produce occasional oval, terminal spores, although the other phenotypic characteristics matched. Spores were also occasionally observed when the two previously reported strains were re-examined. Conclusions: Although the source of the bacteraemia in the patient cannot be determined, this report suggests that A colihominis is of clinical significance. Spore formation is proposed as an emended description of A colihominis.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent310755 bytes
 
dc.format.extent711321 bytes
 
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dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
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dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2006, v. 59 n. 7, p. 748-752 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2005.031773
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2005.031773
 
dc.identifier.epage752
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238592900016
 
dc.identifier.issn0021-9746
2013 Impact Factor: 2.551
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1860411
 
dc.identifier.pmid16467163
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745924162
 
dc.identifier.spage748
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45171
 
dc.identifier.volume59
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pathology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Pathology. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshBacteremia-microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshGram-Positive-Bacteria-classification
 
dc.subject.meshGram-Positive-Bacterial-Infections-microbiology
 
dc.titleBacteraemia caused by Anaerotruncus colihominis and emended description of the species
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
  3. null