File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Effects of SARS on consultations in primary care in Hong Kong

TitleEffects of SARS on consultations in primary care in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsConsultation
Primary care
SARS
Issue Date2003
PublisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcfp.org.hk/
Citation
Hong Kong Practitioner, 2003, v. 25 n. 11, p. 532-541 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study the infection control measures and concerns in primary care practices, and the effects of SARS on primary care consultation using the Leicester Assessment Package (LAP) criteria during the SARS episode in Hong Kong. Design: A postal survey using a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three parts on the demographic data, infection control precautions taken and concerns of the respondents, and the effect of SARS on consultations. Subjects: Full members and fellows of the HKCFP. Main outcome measures: Infection control precautions including performance of initial screening/triage, by whom and how these were carried out, actions for the triaged patients, use of personal protection equipments (PPE), organisation and format of infection control training of staff and decontamination practice; perceptions of adequacy of protection and areas of concern; and proportion and degree to which consultation skills were affected using the LAP criteria. Results: The response rate was 60%. 71.4% respondents triaged their patients. 85.9% took temperatures of their patients. All respondents wore a mask during consultations. 69.8% organised training for their staff and clinic. Most respondents regularly decontaminated their clinic. 56% felt adequately protected by their infection control precautions and use of PPE but 44% did not. The major concerns were the variable clinical presentations of SARS, the practicability of wearing full protection, and the lack of early and reliable diagnostic tests. The type of practice was found to be a factor affecting the choice of infection control precautions. Consultation skills were found to be affected in ≤ 25% of consultations. History taking, physical examination, management and problem solving were found to be more difficult but relationship with patients and anticipatory care became easier. Conclusion: Choice of infection control precautions was related to the type of practice. The major concerns of primary care physicians were the variable clinical presentations of SARS and the lack of early and reliable diagnostic tests. Consultation skills were affected in ≤ 25% of consultations but patients were found to be more receptive to anticipatory care.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45141
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, RSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFraser, RCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, DKTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:18:14Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:18:14Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Practitioner, 2003, v. 25 n. 11, p. 532-541en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1027-3948en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45141-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study the infection control measures and concerns in primary care practices, and the effects of SARS on primary care consultation using the Leicester Assessment Package (LAP) criteria during the SARS episode in Hong Kong. Design: A postal survey using a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three parts on the demographic data, infection control precautions taken and concerns of the respondents, and the effect of SARS on consultations. Subjects: Full members and fellows of the HKCFP. Main outcome measures: Infection control precautions including performance of initial screening/triage, by whom and how these were carried out, actions for the triaged patients, use of personal protection equipments (PPE), organisation and format of infection control training of staff and decontamination practice; perceptions of adequacy of protection and areas of concern; and proportion and degree to which consultation skills were affected using the LAP criteria. Results: The response rate was 60%. 71.4% respondents triaged their patients. 85.9% took temperatures of their patients. All respondents wore a mask during consultations. 69.8% organised training for their staff and clinic. Most respondents regularly decontaminated their clinic. 56% felt adequately protected by their infection control precautions and use of PPE but 44% did not. The major concerns were the variable clinical presentations of SARS, the practicability of wearing full protection, and the lack of early and reliable diagnostic tests. The type of practice was found to be a factor affecting the choice of infection control precautions. Consultation skills were found to be affected in ≤ 25% of consultations. History taking, physical examination, management and problem solving were found to be more difficult but relationship with patients and anticipatory care became easier. Conclusion: Choice of infection control precautions was related to the type of practice. The major concerns of primary care physicians were the variable clinical presentations of SARS and the lack of early and reliable diagnostic tests. Consultation skills were affected in ≤ 25% of consultations but patients were found to be more receptive to anticipatory care.en_HK
dc.format.extent619419 bytes-
dc.format.extent6261 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcfp.org.hk/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Practitioneren_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectConsultationen_HK
dc.subjectPrimary careen_HK
dc.subjectSARSen_HK
dc.titleEffects of SARS on consultations in primary care in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1027-3948&volume=25&issue=11&spage=532&epage=541&date=2003&atitle=Effects+of+SARS+on+consultations+in+primary+care+in+Hong+Kong.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK:clklam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1142311608en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros86235-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1142311608&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage532en_HK
dc.identifier.epage541en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, RSY=10341071600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFraser, RC=13007931600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CLK=24755913900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, KS=7403581605en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, DKT=7405320848en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats