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Article: Learning from the problems of problem-based learning

TitleLearning from the problems of problem-based learning
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmededuc/
Citation
Bmc Medical Education, 2004, v. 4, p. 1-7 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The last decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of biomedical knowledge. Despite this, fashions in medical education over the same period have shifted away from factual (didactic) teaching and towards contextual, or problem-based, learning (PBL). This paradigm shift has been justified by studies showing that PBL improves reasoning and communication while being associated with few if any detectable knowledge deficits. Discussion: Analysis of the literature indicates that the recent rapid rise of PBL has closely paralleled the timing of the information explosion. The growing dominance of PBL could thus worsen the problems of information management in medical education via several mechanisms: first, by creating the impression that a defined spectrum of core factual knowledge suffices for clinical competence despite ongoing knowledge expansion (quality cost); second, by dissuading teachers from refining the educational utility of didactic modalities (improvement cost); and third, by reducing faculty time for developing reusable resources to impart factual knowledge more efficiently (opportunity cost). Summary: These costs of PBL imply a need for strengthening the knowledge base of 21st-century medical graduates. New initiatives towards this end could include the development of more integrated cognitive techniques for facilitating the comprehension of complex data; the design of differentiated medical curricula for producing graduates with defined high-priority skill sets; and the encouragement of more cost-effective faculty teaching activities focused on the prototyping and testing of innovative commercializable educational tools.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45137
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.312
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.698
PubMed Central ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEpstein, RJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:18:10Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:18:10Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Medical Education, 2004, v. 4, p. 1-7en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45137-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The last decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of biomedical knowledge. Despite this, fashions in medical education over the same period have shifted away from factual (didactic) teaching and towards contextual, or problem-based, learning (PBL). This paradigm shift has been justified by studies showing that PBL improves reasoning and communication while being associated with few if any detectable knowledge deficits. Discussion: Analysis of the literature indicates that the recent rapid rise of PBL has closely paralleled the timing of the information explosion. The growing dominance of PBL could thus worsen the problems of information management in medical education via several mechanisms: first, by creating the impression that a defined spectrum of core factual knowledge suffices for clinical competence despite ongoing knowledge expansion (quality cost); second, by dissuading teachers from refining the educational utility of didactic modalities (improvement cost); and third, by reducing faculty time for developing reusable resources to impart factual knowledge more efficiently (opportunity cost). Summary: These costs of PBL imply a need for strengthening the knowledge base of 21st-century medical graduates. New initiatives towards this end could include the development of more integrated cognitive techniques for facilitating the comprehension of complex data; the design of differentiated medical curricula for producing graduates with defined high-priority skill sets; and the encouragement of more cost-effective faculty teaching activities focused on the prototyping and testing of innovative commercializable educational tools.en_HK
dc.format.extent302458 bytes-
dc.format.extent778492 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmededuc/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Medical Educationen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical - organization & administration - standards - trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProblem-Based Learning - organization & administration - standards - trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshEfficiency, Organizationalen_HK
dc.subject.meshForecastingen_HK
dc.titleLearning from the problems of problem-based learningen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1472-6920&volume=4&spage=1&epage=7&date=2004&atitle=Learning+from+the+problems+of+problem-based+learningen_HK
dc.identifier.emailEpstein, RJ: repstein@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEpstein, RJ=rp00501en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6920-4-1en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14713320-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC328087-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2942627681en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros86228-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2942627681&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage7en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEpstein, RJ=34975074500en_HK

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