File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio in non-hypoglycorrhachic neurological conditions

TitleCerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio in non-hypoglycorrhachic neurological conditions
Authors
KeywordsBlood glucose
Cerebrospinal fluid
Glucose/cerebrospinal fluid
Spinal puncture
Issue Date2005
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2005, v. 11 n. 6, p. 457-462 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To explore the relevance of cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio in non-hypoglycorrhachic conditions. Design. Retrospective observational study. Setting. Neurology ward, university teaching hospital, Hong Kong. Patients. Adult patients with conditions unrelated to hypoglycorrhachia who underwent lumbar puncture. Main outcome measures. Cerebrospinal fluid and simultaneous serum glucose concentrations, and their ratio to each other. Results. Between September 1998 and August 2003, 170 cerebrospinal fluid and serum glucose samples were collected from 138 patients. Mean cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio was 0.61 (standard deviation, 0.142; range, 0.21-1.00). With the exception of cerebrospinal fluid protein level, laboratory parameters were similar among different diseases. The glucose ratio was lower than 0.6 in 43% and lower than 0.5 in 19% of samples. Cases with a low glucose ratio appeared to have higher serum glucose concentrations (significant among groups with different glucose ratios, P<0.001). The mean glucose ratio (0.65) was also significantly higher in patients with serum glucose concentration of lower than 7.8 mmol/L compared with those with serum glucose concentration between 7.8 and 11.1 mmol/L (mean, 0.46), or higher than 11.1 mmol/L (mean, 0.46) [P<0.001]. There was a strong negative correlation between the glucose ratio and serum glucose concentration (r= -0.704, P<0.001). Conclusion. A lowered cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio is often seen in the absence of an appropriate disorder, especially when simultaneous serum glucose concentration is elevated. This may be explained by the saturation kinetics of glucose transportation in hyperglycaemia, and the time lag for cerebrospinal fluid and glucose to equilibrate when the blood level fluctuates.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45017
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, TSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:15:41Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:15:41Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2005, v. 11 n. 6, p. 457-462en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45017-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To explore the relevance of cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio in non-hypoglycorrhachic conditions. Design. Retrospective observational study. Setting. Neurology ward, university teaching hospital, Hong Kong. Patients. Adult patients with conditions unrelated to hypoglycorrhachia who underwent lumbar puncture. Main outcome measures. Cerebrospinal fluid and simultaneous serum glucose concentrations, and their ratio to each other. Results. Between September 1998 and August 2003, 170 cerebrospinal fluid and serum glucose samples were collected from 138 patients. Mean cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio was 0.61 (standard deviation, 0.142; range, 0.21-1.00). With the exception of cerebrospinal fluid protein level, laboratory parameters were similar among different diseases. The glucose ratio was lower than 0.6 in 43% and lower than 0.5 in 19% of samples. Cases with a low glucose ratio appeared to have higher serum glucose concentrations (significant among groups with different glucose ratios, P<0.001). The mean glucose ratio (0.65) was also significantly higher in patients with serum glucose concentration of lower than 7.8 mmol/L compared with those with serum glucose concentration between 7.8 and 11.1 mmol/L (mean, 0.46), or higher than 11.1 mmol/L (mean, 0.46) [P<0.001]. There was a strong negative correlation between the glucose ratio and serum glucose concentration (r= -0.704, P<0.001). Conclusion. A lowered cerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio is often seen in the absence of an appropriate disorder, especially when simultaneous serum glucose concentration is elevated. This may be explained by the saturation kinetics of glucose transportation in hyperglycaemia, and the time lag for cerebrospinal fluid and glucose to equilibrate when the blood level fluctuates.en_HK
dc.format.extent374709 bytes-
dc.format.extent12228 bytes-
dc.format.extent9894 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Medical Association.-
dc.subjectBlood glucoseen_HK
dc.subjectCerebrospinal fluiden_HK
dc.subjectGlucose/cerebrospinal fluiden_HK
dc.subjectSpinal punctureen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshCerebrospinal Fluid - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshGlucose - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshNervous System Diseases - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpinal Punctureen_HK
dc.titleCerebrospinal fluid to serum glucose ratio in non-hypoglycorrhachic neurological conditionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=11&issue=6&spage=457&epage=462&date=2005&atitle=Cerebrospinal+fluid+to+serum+glucose+ratio+in+non-hypoglycorrhachic+neurological+conditionsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF:rtcheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SL:slho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SL=rp00240en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16340022-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-30944444969en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115086-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-30944444969&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage457en_HK
dc.identifier.epage462en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, W=22948344000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, TS=7404082613en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034963en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, RTF=7202397498en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SL=25959633500en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats