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Article: The bad biodiversity: alien plant species in Hong Kong

TitleThe bad biodiversity: alien plant species in Hong Kong
不受歡迎的生物多樣性:香港的外來植物物種
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Exotic species
Invasive species
Issue Date2002
PublisherBiodiversity Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biodiversity-science.net/
Citation
Biodiversity Science, 2002, v. 10 n. 1, p. 109-118 How to Cite?
生物多樣性, 2002, v. 10 n. 1, p. 109-118 How to Cite?
AbstractThe flora of Hong Kong has been well-surveyed since the mid nineteenth century and has had a long history of alien plant invasions. To the present day, more than 2130 wild plant species have been recorded, including 238 species that are probably naturalized alien species. Among them, Mikania micrantha, Ipomoea cairica, Eupatorium catarium, and Panicum maximum are most abundant. Naturalized alien plants are most prominent in human-disturbed habitats, such as abandoned farmland, wasteland and roadsides, and are rarely important in relatively undisturbed forest habitats, or in fire-maintained impoverished shrubland and grassland. Impacts of naturalized alien plants on local ecosystems are so far limited to lowland habitats, including wetlands and forest margins, where they form monospecific thickets, out-compete native plant species, and reduce local habitat and animal diversity. The biggest impact on the local flora by an alien species, however, was caused by the Pinewood Nematode introduced in the 1970s. Introduction of alien vertebrates may also have an impact on Hong Kong' s vegetation. As the biggest port on the southern coast of China, Hong Kong has probably been an important entry point for alien species to China. Among Hong Kong' s naturalized alien plants, some have only recently been noticed, and have few or no records from the mainland. The potential for these species to invade the mainland should not be neglected. Appropriate measures to control spread of these plants, both locally and regionally, are essential.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44716
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, RTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:08:31Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:08:31Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiodiversity Science, 2002, v. 10 n. 1, p. 109-118en_HK
dc.identifier.citation生物多樣性, 2002, v. 10 n. 1, p. 109-118zh_HK
dc.identifier.issn1005-0094en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44716-
dc.description.abstractThe flora of Hong Kong has been well-surveyed since the mid nineteenth century and has had a long history of alien plant invasions. To the present day, more than 2130 wild plant species have been recorded, including 238 species that are probably naturalized alien species. Among them, Mikania micrantha, Ipomoea cairica, Eupatorium catarium, and Panicum maximum are most abundant. Naturalized alien plants are most prominent in human-disturbed habitats, such as abandoned farmland, wasteland and roadsides, and are rarely important in relatively undisturbed forest habitats, or in fire-maintained impoverished shrubland and grassland. Impacts of naturalized alien plants on local ecosystems are so far limited to lowland habitats, including wetlands and forest margins, where they form monospecific thickets, out-compete native plant species, and reduce local habitat and animal diversity. The biggest impact on the local flora by an alien species, however, was caused by the Pinewood Nematode introduced in the 1970s. Introduction of alien vertebrates may also have an impact on Hong Kong' s vegetation. As the biggest port on the southern coast of China, Hong Kong has probably been an important entry point for alien species to China. Among Hong Kong' s naturalized alien plants, some have only recently been noticed, and have few or no records from the mainland. The potential for these species to invade the mainland should not be neglected. Appropriate measures to control spread of these plants, both locally and regionally, are essential.en_HK
dc.format.extent386400 bytes-
dc.format.extent461500 bytes-
dc.format.extent578 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languagechien_HK
dc.publisherBiodiversity Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biodiversity-science.net/en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsBiodiversity Science. Copyright © Biodiversity Science.en_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectExotic speciesen_HK
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_HK
dc.titleThe bad biodiversity: alien plant species in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.title不受歡迎的生物多樣性:香港的外來植物物種zh_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1005-0094&volume=10&issue=1&spage=109&epage=118&date=2002&atitle=The+bad+biodiversity:+alien+plant+species+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros67814-

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