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Article: Foraging in the limpet Patella vulgata: The influence of rock slope on the timing of activity

TitleForaging in the limpet Patella vulgata: The influence of rock slope on the timing of activity
Authors
KeywordsBiology
Issue Date1999
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=MBI
Citation
Journal Of The Marine Biological Association Of The United Kingdom, 1999, v. 79 n. 5, p. 881-889 How to Cite?
AbstractPreliminary observations of limpet activity at Lough Hyne, in south-west Ireland, showed that individuals on steep slopes were primarily active at night, when emersed; while those on near-horizontal rocks were often active during daytime submersion. Observations over an 11 d period of limpet populations on a near-vertical and a near-horizontal site, only 45 m apart, confirmed that animals on the near-vertical site were active on nocturnal low tides, whilst those on the near-horizontal site were active on daytime high waters. A short-term survey at ten sites, which had limpets on both extremes of slope (i.e. either near-vertical or near-horizontal), showed that limpets on near-horizontal surfaces were, on average, more active at daytime high waters than those on near-vertical faces. In 1996 and 1997 surveys of activity at daytime high, and nocturnal low waters were conducted at sites (14 - 15) with varying rock slopes (~3 - 87°). In all cases, limpets on more steep slopes were active at nocturnal emersion whilst animals on more gentle slopes were active on daytime submersion periods. In most cases these trends were significant and explained between 22 - 40% and 37 - 44% of the variation in activity with site in 1996 and 1997 respectively. Analysis of the head orientation of limpets on their home scars showed that animals orientated in a down shore direction at all sites (1997 data) suggesting that limpets do perceive and respond to slope. Whilst slope does appear to influence the timing of limpets' activity (and especially on very steep or gently sloping sites) it does not account for a large degree of the variation in activity and, on sites with slopes between 30 and 60°, is likely to work in combination with other factors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44714
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.094
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.509
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMorritt, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorStirling, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTeagle, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorMiles, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPilling, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorConsalvey, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:08:29Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Marine Biological Association Of The United Kingdom, 1999, v. 79 n. 5, p. 881-889en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0025-3154en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44714-
dc.description.abstractPreliminary observations of limpet activity at Lough Hyne, in south-west Ireland, showed that individuals on steep slopes were primarily active at night, when emersed; while those on near-horizontal rocks were often active during daytime submersion. Observations over an 11 d period of limpet populations on a near-vertical and a near-horizontal site, only 45 m apart, confirmed that animals on the near-vertical site were active on nocturnal low tides, whilst those on the near-horizontal site were active on daytime high waters. A short-term survey at ten sites, which had limpets on both extremes of slope (i.e. either near-vertical or near-horizontal), showed that limpets on near-horizontal surfaces were, on average, more active at daytime high waters than those on near-vertical faces. In 1996 and 1997 surveys of activity at daytime high, and nocturnal low waters were conducted at sites (14 - 15) with varying rock slopes (~3 - 87°). In all cases, limpets on more steep slopes were active at nocturnal emersion whilst animals on more gentle slopes were active on daytime submersion periods. In most cases these trends were significant and explained between 22 - 40% and 37 - 44% of the variation in activity with site in 1996 and 1997 respectively. Analysis of the head orientation of limpets on their home scars showed that animals orientated in a down shore direction at all sites (1997 data) suggesting that limpets do perceive and respond to slope. Whilst slope does appear to influence the timing of limpets' activity (and especially on very steep or gently sloping sites) it does not account for a large degree of the variation in activity and, on sites with slopes between 30 and 60°, is likely to work in combination with other factors.en_HK
dc.format.extent166701 bytes-
dc.format.extent2504 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=MBIen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdomen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBiologyen_HK
dc.titleForaging in the limpet Patella vulgata: The influence of rock slope on the timing of activityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0025-3154&volume=79&issue=5&spage=881&epage=889&date=1999&atitle=Foraging+in+the+limpet+Patella+vulgata:+the+influence+of+rock+slope+on+the+timing+of+activityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0025315498001040en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032693707en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros53763-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032693707&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume79en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage881en_HK
dc.identifier.epage889en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000083210200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLittle, C=7202893635en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorritt, D=7003560499en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStirling, P=54888715700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTeagle, L=6506083039en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMiles, A=7103016187en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPilling, G=6603831633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConsalvey, M=6508103977en_HK

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