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Article: Effects of extreme rainfall, typhoons and declaration of marine reserve status on corals beached at Cape d'Aguilar (1998 and 1999)

TitleEffects of extreme rainfall, typhoons and declaration of marine reserve status on corals beached at Cape d'Aguilar (1998 and 1999)
Authors
KeywordsBiology
Issue Date2002
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=MBI
Citation
Journal of Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 2002, v. 82 n. 5, p. 729-743 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the years 1996 and 1997, the pattern of deposition of beached coral heads and pieces onto the shore of Telecom Bay within the Cape d'Aguilar Marine Reserve, Hong Kong suggested that typhoons were a significant natural perturbation. In August 1997, 808 pieces weighing 60,930 g were washed up following passage of Typhoon Victor. 1997 was also Hong Kong's wettest year on record and a survey of the living corals in the reserve in 1998 showed changes in a number of ecological parameters of species richness, composition and diversity but, most noticeably, that the formerly dominant Goniastrea aspera had been superseded by Platygyra sinensis. In 1998 and 1999, this was reflected in the changed proportions of these two beached corals. Dramatically lowered salinities in the bay during July and August 1997 may have effected this change in relative dominance. Following Typhoon Dan in October 1998, 342 pieces of corals weighing 75,600 g were collected. The 1996 and 1997 pattern seemed to be repeating itself. 1999 was a bad year for severe tropical storms and typhoons in Hong Kong, seven being reported upon. Yet, after each one only 12,490 g (Typhoon Leo), 3390 g (Typhoon Maggie), 3550 g (Severe Tropical Storm: no-name), 55 g (Typhoon Sam), 4500 g (Typhoon York and Typhoon Cam) and 3160 g (Typhoon Dan) were washed up. That is, the seven tropical depressions deposited about 27,640 g coral, approximately the same amount as only Typhoon Sally in 1996 (25,000 g) and Tropical Storm Penny and Typhoon Babs in 1998 (24,574 g) and less than half that of Typhoon Victor in 1997 (60,000 g). In July 1996, Cape d'Aguilar was declared a marine reserve, fishing banned in its 18 hectares of sea and ghost nets removed. The fishing ban seems to be halting the dislodgement of corals and they are thus not now being beached by typhoons.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44706
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.094
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.509
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMorton, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:08:18Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:08:18Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 2002, v. 82 n. 5, p. 729-743en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0025-3154en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44706-
dc.description.abstractIn the years 1996 and 1997, the pattern of deposition of beached coral heads and pieces onto the shore of Telecom Bay within the Cape d'Aguilar Marine Reserve, Hong Kong suggested that typhoons were a significant natural perturbation. In August 1997, 808 pieces weighing 60,930 g were washed up following passage of Typhoon Victor. 1997 was also Hong Kong's wettest year on record and a survey of the living corals in the reserve in 1998 showed changes in a number of ecological parameters of species richness, composition and diversity but, most noticeably, that the formerly dominant Goniastrea aspera had been superseded by Platygyra sinensis. In 1998 and 1999, this was reflected in the changed proportions of these two beached corals. Dramatically lowered salinities in the bay during July and August 1997 may have effected this change in relative dominance. Following Typhoon Dan in October 1998, 342 pieces of corals weighing 75,600 g were collected. The 1996 and 1997 pattern seemed to be repeating itself. 1999 was a bad year for severe tropical storms and typhoons in Hong Kong, seven being reported upon. Yet, after each one only 12,490 g (Typhoon Leo), 3390 g (Typhoon Maggie), 3550 g (Severe Tropical Storm: no-name), 55 g (Typhoon Sam), 4500 g (Typhoon York and Typhoon Cam) and 3160 g (Typhoon Dan) were washed up. That is, the seven tropical depressions deposited about 27,640 g coral, approximately the same amount as only Typhoon Sally in 1996 (25,000 g) and Tropical Storm Penny and Typhoon Babs in 1998 (24,574 g) and less than half that of Typhoon Victor in 1997 (60,000 g). In July 1996, Cape d'Aguilar was declared a marine reserve, fishing banned in its 18 hectares of sea and ghost nets removed. The fishing ban seems to be halting the dislodgement of corals and they are thus not now being beached by typhoons.en_HK
dc.format.extent657251 bytes-
dc.format.extent455 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=MBIen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectBiologyen_HK
dc.titleEffects of extreme rainfall, typhoons and declaration of marine reserve status on corals beached at Cape d'Aguilar (1998 and 1999)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0025-3154&volume=82&issue=5&spage=729&epage=743&date=2002&atitle=Effects+of+extreme+rainfall,+typhoons+and+declaration+of+marine+reserve+status+on+corals+beached+at+Cape+d%27Aguilar+(1998+and+1999)en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0025315402006100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036774393-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179144800003-

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