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Article: No effect of a high-fat diet on promotion of sex hormone-induced prostate and mammary carcinogenesis in the Noble rat model

TitleNo effect of a high-fat diet on promotion of sex hormone-induced prostate and mammary carcinogenesis in the Noble rat model
Authors
KeywordsBreast cancer
Carcinogenesis
Dietary fat
Noble rats
Prostate cancer
Vitamin E
Issue Date2002
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN
Citation
British Journal Of Nutrition, 2002, v. 88 n. 4, p. 399-409 How to Cite?
AbstractResults of international correlation and migrant studies suggest that dietary fat promotes carcinogenesis in hormone-sensitive sites, but this is disputed. In the present study, we used a Noble rat model of sex hormone-induced cancers to examine the effect of a high-fat diet on the incidence and latency of prostate and mammary cancer in male (n 139) and female (n 72) animals respectively. We also measured α-tocopherol levels in female breast tissue to determine whether a high intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids depletes antioxidant defence in target tissues, providing a possible potentiating mechanism for carcinogenesis. Results showed a very high incidence of hormone-induced adenocarcinomas of prostate and mammary gland, irrespective of diet. There was no difference in the pattern of carcinogenesis in different prostatic locations, weight of the prostate, or weight gain between male rats on the high-fat diet compared with the control (standard, low-fat) diet. In female rats, the incidence of mammary cancer and the body-weight gain were the same in both dietary groups, and breast α-tocopherol was also unaffected by dietary fat intake. Our present results are supportive of recent cohort studies that reported no significant association between intake of fat and the development of human prostate and breast cancer, and do not support a role for dietary fat in promoting sex hormone-induced prostate and mammary carcinogenesis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44573
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.311
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.587
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBenzie, IFFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsao, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:04:39Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Nutrition, 2002, v. 88 n. 4, p. 399-409en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-1145en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44573-
dc.description.abstractResults of international correlation and migrant studies suggest that dietary fat promotes carcinogenesis in hormone-sensitive sites, but this is disputed. In the present study, we used a Noble rat model of sex hormone-induced cancers to examine the effect of a high-fat diet on the incidence and latency of prostate and mammary cancer in male (n 139) and female (n 72) animals respectively. We also measured α-tocopherol levels in female breast tissue to determine whether a high intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids depletes antioxidant defence in target tissues, providing a possible potentiating mechanism for carcinogenesis. Results showed a very high incidence of hormone-induced adenocarcinomas of prostate and mammary gland, irrespective of diet. There was no difference in the pattern of carcinogenesis in different prostatic locations, weight of the prostate, or weight gain between male rats on the high-fat diet compared with the control (standard, low-fat) diet. In female rats, the incidence of mammary cancer and the body-weight gain were the same in both dietary groups, and breast α-tocopherol was also unaffected by dietary fat intake. Our present results are supportive of recent cohort studies that reported no significant association between intake of fat and the development of human prostate and breast cancer, and do not support a role for dietary fat in promoting sex hormone-induced prostate and mammary carcinogenesis.en_HK
dc.format.extent234587 bytes-
dc.format.extent3653 bytes-
dc.format.extent2603 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJNen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Nutritionen_HK
dc.rightsThe British Journal of Nutrition. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBreast canceren_HK
dc.subjectCarcinogenesisen_HK
dc.subjectDietary faten_HK
dc.subjectNoble ratsen_HK
dc.subjectProstate canceren_HK
dc.subjectVitamin Een_HK
dc.subject.meshDietary Fats - administration & dosageen_HK
dc.subject.meshMammary Neoplasms, Experimental - blood - etiology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms - blood - etiology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTestosterone - blood - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshalpha-Tocopherol - analysisen_HK
dc.titleNo effect of a high-fat diet on promotion of sex hormone-induced prostate and mammary carcinogenesis in the Noble rat modelen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0007-1145&volume=88&issue=4&spage=399&epage=409&date=2002&atitle=No+effect+of+a+high-fat+diet+on+promotion+of+sex+hormone-induced+prostate+and+mammary+carcinogenesis+in+the+Noble+rat+modelen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, G:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, A:lmcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsao, SW:gswtsao@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC:ycwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, G=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, A=rp00332en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsao, SW=rp00399en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00316en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1079/BJN2002673en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12323089-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036774665en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros74700-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036774665&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume88en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage399en_HK
dc.identifier.epage409en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000178241700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, G=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBenzie, IFF=7004481510en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, A=7401806497en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsao, SW=7102813116en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041798en_HK

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