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Article: A review: neural control of mastication in humans as influenced by food texture

TitleA review: neural control of mastication in humans as influenced by food texture
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherMedknow Publications Pvt Ltd.
Citation
Indian Journal of Dental Research, 2002, v. 13 n. 3-4, p. 125-134 How to Cite?
AbstractThis review summerizes recent approaches to the physiology of the masticatory system in humans that aim to understand how the process is influenced by the material properties of foods. The centerpiece is a group of experiments that show that the rate of breakdown of food in human mastification depends principally on the combination of two mechanical properties of foods: toughness(R) and modulus of elasticity (E). Two mechanical indices are constructed from these properties: the square root of their product, (ER)0.5, is predicted to explain the resistance to an incisal bite, while the square root of their ratio, (R/E)0.5 is predicted to control the rate of fragmentation during a postcanie bite. Evidence for the latter is reviewed, which also appears to modulate the activity of jaw closing muscles and the extent of lateral mandibular movement during mastication. These studies provide a quantified link between This review summerizes recent approaches to the physiology of the masticatory system in humans that aim to understand how the process is influenced by the material propoerties of foods, the centerpiece is a group of experiments that show that the rate of breakdown of food in human mastification depends principally on the combination of two mechanical properties of. foods: toughness(R) and modulus of elasticity (E).'-Two mechanical indices are constructed from these properties: the square root of their product,. (ER)°5, is predicted to explain the rsistance to an incisal bite, while the square root of their ratio, (R/E)0-5 is predicted to control the rate of fragmentation during a postcanie bite. Evidence for the latter is reviewed, which also appears to modulate the activity of jaw closing muscles and the extent of lateral mandibular movement during mastication. These studies provide a quantified link between the food stimulus and the physiological response of the mastiatory system for which we know of no parellel. Attempts to extend this analysis have been made by psychophysical investigations of food texture. These support some sensitivity to the mechanical index that we have identified; but are not conclusive.' Finally,' we provide a chart summarizing physiological responses to food texture that could interest dentists, food scientists and also those interested in the analysis of dentition and diet in mammals. the food stimulus and the physiological response of the mastiatory system for which we know of no parallel. Attempts to extend this analysis have been made by psychophysical investigations of food texture. These support some sensitivity to the mechanical index that we have identified, but are not conclusive. Finally, we provide a chart summarizing physiological responses to food texture that could interest dentists, food scientists and also those interested in the analysis of dentition and diet in mammals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44570
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.243

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAgarwal, KRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLucas, PWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:04:34Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:04:34Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIndian Journal of Dental Research, 2002, v. 13 n. 3-4, p. 125-134en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0970-9290en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44570-
dc.description.abstractThis review summerizes recent approaches to the physiology of the masticatory system in humans that aim to understand how the process is influenced by the material properties of foods. The centerpiece is a group of experiments that show that the rate of breakdown of food in human mastification depends principally on the combination of two mechanical properties of foods: toughness(R) and modulus of elasticity (E). Two mechanical indices are constructed from these properties: the square root of their product, (ER)0.5, is predicted to explain the resistance to an incisal bite, while the square root of their ratio, (R/E)0.5 is predicted to control the rate of fragmentation during a postcanie bite. Evidence for the latter is reviewed, which also appears to modulate the activity of jaw closing muscles and the extent of lateral mandibular movement during mastication. These studies provide a quantified link between This review summerizes recent approaches to the physiology of the masticatory system in humans that aim to understand how the process is influenced by the material propoerties of foods, the centerpiece is a group of experiments that show that the rate of breakdown of food in human mastification depends principally on the combination of two mechanical properties of. foods: toughness(R) and modulus of elasticity (E).'-Two mechanical indices are constructed from these properties: the square root of their product,. (ER)°5, is predicted to explain the rsistance to an incisal bite, while the square root of their ratio, (R/E)0-5 is predicted to control the rate of fragmentation during a postcanie bite. Evidence for the latter is reviewed, which also appears to modulate the activity of jaw closing muscles and the extent of lateral mandibular movement during mastication. These studies provide a quantified link between the food stimulus and the physiological response of the mastiatory system for which we know of no parellel. Attempts to extend this analysis have been made by psychophysical investigations of food texture. These support some sensitivity to the mechanical index that we have identified; but are not conclusive.' Finally,' we provide a chart summarizing physiological responses to food texture that could interest dentists, food scientists and also those interested in the analysis of dentition and diet in mammals. the food stimulus and the physiological response of the mastiatory system for which we know of no parallel. Attempts to extend this analysis have been made by psychophysical investigations of food texture. These support some sensitivity to the mechanical index that we have identified, but are not conclusive. Finally, we provide a chart summarizing physiological responses to food texture that could interest dentists, food scientists and also those interested in the analysis of dentition and diet in mammals.en_HK
dc.format.extent2386149 bytes-
dc.format.extent1757 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMedknow Publications Pvt Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics-en_HK
dc.subject.meshFood-en_HK
dc.subject.meshMastication-physiologyen_HK
dc.titleA review: neural control of mastication in humans as influenced by food textureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0970-9290&volume=13&issue=3-4&spage=125&epage=134&date=2002&atitle=A+review:+neural+control+of+mastication+in+humans+as+influenced+by+food+textureen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12765092-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037636690-

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