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Article: Active control with an isoluminant display

TitleActive control with an isoluminant display
Authors
KeywordsChromatic display
Contrast
Manual control
One-dimensional (1-D) motion
Speed perception
Issue Date2006
PublisherIEEE.
Citation
IEEE Transactions On Systems, Man, And Cybernetics Part A:Systems And Humans, 2006, v. 36 n. 6, p. 1124-1134 How to Cite?
AbstractHumans perceive isoluminant visual stimuli (i.e., stimuli that show little or no luminance variation across space) to move more slowly than their luminance-defined counterparts. To explore whether impaired motion perception at isoluminance also affects visuomotor control tasks, the authors examined the performance as humans actively controlled a moving line. They tested two types of displays matched for an overall salience: a luminant display composed of a luminance-defined Gaussian-blurred horizontal line and an isoluminant display composed of a color-defined line with the same spatial characteristics, but near-zero luminance information. Six subjects were asked to use a joystick to keep the line centered on a cathode ray tube display as its vertical position was perturbed pseudorandomly by a sum of ten sinusoids under two control regimes (velocity and acceleration control). The mean root mean square position error was larger for the isoluminant than for the luminant line (mean across subjects: 22% and 29% larger, for the two regimes, respectively). The describing functions (Bode plots) showed that, compared to the luminant line, the isoluminant line showed a lower open-loop gain (mean decrease: 3.4 and 2.9 dB, respectively) and an increase in phase lag, which can be accounted for by an increase in reaction time (mean increase: 103 and 155 ms, respectively). The performance data are generally well fit by McRuer et al.'s classical crossover model. In conclusion, both our model-independent and model-dependent analyses show that the selective loss of luminance information impairs human active control performance, which is consistent with the preferential loss of information from cortical visual motion processing pathways. Display engineers must therefore be mindful of the importance of luminance-contrast per se (not just total stimulus salience) in the design of effective visual displays for closed-loop active control tasks. © 2006 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44541
ISSN
2012 Impact Factor: 2.183
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.458
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorSweet, BTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStone, LSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:03:41Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:03:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Transactions On Systems, Man, And Cybernetics Part A:Systems And Humans, 2006, v. 36 n. 6, p. 1124-1134en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1083-4427en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44541-
dc.description.abstractHumans perceive isoluminant visual stimuli (i.e., stimuli that show little or no luminance variation across space) to move more slowly than their luminance-defined counterparts. To explore whether impaired motion perception at isoluminance also affects visuomotor control tasks, the authors examined the performance as humans actively controlled a moving line. They tested two types of displays matched for an overall salience: a luminant display composed of a luminance-defined Gaussian-blurred horizontal line and an isoluminant display composed of a color-defined line with the same spatial characteristics, but near-zero luminance information. Six subjects were asked to use a joystick to keep the line centered on a cathode ray tube display as its vertical position was perturbed pseudorandomly by a sum of ten sinusoids under two control regimes (velocity and acceleration control). The mean root mean square position error was larger for the isoluminant than for the luminant line (mean across subjects: 22% and 29% larger, for the two regimes, respectively). The describing functions (Bode plots) showed that, compared to the luminant line, the isoluminant line showed a lower open-loop gain (mean decrease: 3.4 and 2.9 dB, respectively) and an increase in phase lag, which can be accounted for by an increase in reaction time (mean increase: 103 and 155 ms, respectively). The performance data are generally well fit by McRuer et al.'s classical crossover model. In conclusion, both our model-independent and model-dependent analyses show that the selective loss of luminance information impairs human active control performance, which is consistent with the preferential loss of information from cortical visual motion processing pathways. Display engineers must therefore be mindful of the importance of luminance-contrast per se (not just total stimulus salience) in the design of effective visual displays for closed-loop active control tasks. © 2006 IEEE.en_HK
dc.format.extent371970 bytes-
dc.format.extent1780 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Part A:Systems and Humansen_HK
dc.rights©2006 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChromatic displayen_HK
dc.subjectContrasten_HK
dc.subjectManual controlen_HK
dc.subjectOne-dimensional (1-D) motionen_HK
dc.subjectSpeed perceptionen_HK
dc.titleActive control with an isoluminant displayen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1083-4427&volume=36&issue=6&spage=1124&epage=1134&date=2006&atitle=Active+Control+With+an+Isoluminant+Displayen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, L:lili@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/TSMCA.2006.878951en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33750587358en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33750587358&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1124en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1134en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241438600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, L=26643188000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSweet, BT=7003591605en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStone, LS=7201963856en_HK

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