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Article: Implicit Theories and Their Role in Judgments and Reactions: A Word From Two Perspectives

TitleImplicit Theories and Their Role in Judgments and Reactions: A Word From Two Perspectives
Authors
KeywordsINFERENCE
JUDGMENT
PSYCHOLOGY
Issue Date1995
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.leaonline.com/loi/pli
Citation
Psychological Inquiry, 1995, v. 6 n. 4, p. 267-285 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this target article, we present evidence for a new model of individual differences in judgments and reactions. The model holds that people's implicit theories about human attributes structure the way they understand and react to human actions and outcomes. We review research showing that when people believe that attributes (such as intelligence or moral character) are fixed, trait-like entities (an entity theory), they tend to understand outcomes and actions in terms of these fixed traits ('I failed the test because I am dumb' or 'He stole the bread because he is dishonest'). In contrast, when people believe that attributes are more dynamic, malleable, and developable (an incremental theory), they tend to focus less on broad traits and, instead, tend to understand outcomes and actions in terms of more specific behavioral or psychological mediators ('I failed the test because of my effort or strategy' or 'He stole the bread because he was desperate'). The two frameworks also appear to foster different reactions: helpless versus mastery-oriented responses to personal setbacks and an emphasis on retribution versus education or rehabilitation for transgressions. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for personality, motivation, and social perception.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44536
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.714
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.166
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDweck, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHong, YYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:03:34Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:03:34Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Inquiry, 1995, v. 6 n. 4, p. 267-285en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1047-840Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44536-
dc.description.abstractIn this target article, we present evidence for a new model of individual differences in judgments and reactions. The model holds that people's implicit theories about human attributes structure the way they understand and react to human actions and outcomes. We review research showing that when people believe that attributes (such as intelligence or moral character) are fixed, trait-like entities (an entity theory), they tend to understand outcomes and actions in terms of these fixed traits ('I failed the test because I am dumb' or 'He stole the bread because he is dishonest'). In contrast, when people believe that attributes are more dynamic, malleable, and developable (an incremental theory), they tend to focus less on broad traits and, instead, tend to understand outcomes and actions in terms of more specific behavioral or psychological mediators ('I failed the test because of my effort or strategy' or 'He stole the bread because he was desperate'). The two frameworks also appear to foster different reactions: helpless versus mastery-oriented responses to personal setbacks and an emphasis on retribution versus education or rehabilitation for transgressions. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for personality, motivation, and social perception.en_HK
dc.format.extent2056002 bytes-
dc.format.extent2152 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.leaonline.com/loi/plien_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsthe article is accepted for publication in Psychological Inquiry. Readers must contact LEA for permission to reprint or use the material in any form.en_HK
dc.subjectINFERENCEen_HK
dc.subjectJUDGMENTen_HK
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGYen_HK
dc.titleImplicit Theories and Their Role in Judgments and Reactions: A Word From Two Perspectivesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1047-840X&volume=6&issue=4&spage=267&epage=285&date=1995&atitle=Implicit+Theories+and+Their+Role+in+Judgments+and+Reactions:+A+Word+From+Two+Perspectivesen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/s15327965pli0604_1en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros11302-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RX39600001-

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