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Article: Glucose intolerance in children with cystic fibrosis
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TitleGlucose intolerance in children with cystic fibrosis
 
AuthorsSolomon, MP
Wilson, DC
Corey, M
Kalnins, D
Zielenski, J
Tsui, LC
Pencharz, P
Durie, P
Sweezey, NB1
 
Issue Date2003
 
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpeds
 
CitationJournal Of Pediatrics, 2003, v. 142 n. 2, p. 128-132 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2003.5
 
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the relations among glucose intolerance, genotype, and exocrine pancreatic status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Study design: Data on 335 patients <18 years of age were from the Toronto CF database. A modified oral glucose tolerance test was given to 94 patients 10 to 18 years of age without recognized CF-related diabetes. CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutations and exocrine pancreatic status were determined for all patients. Results: CF-related diabetes was clinically recognized in 9 of 335 (2.7%) patients <18 years of age, all of whom were pancreatic insufficient, and 8 of 9 had severe (classes I through III) mutations on both alleles. The ninth patient had unidentified mutations. Although all patients given the oral glucose tolerance test were asymptomatic and had normal fasting blood glucose, 16 of 94 (17%) had impaired glucose tolerance and 4 of 94 (4.3%) had CF-related diabetes without fasting hyperglycemia. Abnormal glucose tolerance was associated exclusively with severe mutations and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1C) levels did not correlate with glucose tolerance results. Conclusions: Screening of pancreatic-insufficient, adolescent patients with CF identified more with abnormal oral glucose tolerance than was suspected clinically and is recommended as a routine practice. HbA 1C was not useful in screening for CF-related glucose intolerance.
 
ISSN0022-3476
2012 Impact Factor: 4.035
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.202
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2003.5
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000181144400013
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, MP
 
dc.contributor.authorWilson, DC
 
dc.contributor.authorCorey, M
 
dc.contributor.authorKalnins, D
 
dc.contributor.authorZielenski, J
 
dc.contributor.authorTsui, LC
 
dc.contributor.authorPencharz, P
 
dc.contributor.authorDurie, P
 
dc.contributor.authorSweezey, NB
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-12T03:52:25Z
 
dc.date.available2007-09-12T03:52:25Z
 
dc.date.issued2003
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the relations among glucose intolerance, genotype, and exocrine pancreatic status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Study design: Data on 335 patients <18 years of age were from the Toronto CF database. A modified oral glucose tolerance test was given to 94 patients 10 to 18 years of age without recognized CF-related diabetes. CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutations and exocrine pancreatic status were determined for all patients. Results: CF-related diabetes was clinically recognized in 9 of 335 (2.7%) patients <18 years of age, all of whom were pancreatic insufficient, and 8 of 9 had severe (classes I through III) mutations on both alleles. The ninth patient had unidentified mutations. Although all patients given the oral glucose tolerance test were asymptomatic and had normal fasting blood glucose, 16 of 94 (17%) had impaired glucose tolerance and 4 of 94 (4.3%) had CF-related diabetes without fasting hyperglycemia. Abnormal glucose tolerance was associated exclusively with severe mutations and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1C) levels did not correlate with glucose tolerance results. Conclusions: Screening of pancreatic-insufficient, adolescent patients with CF identified more with abnormal oral glucose tolerance than was suspected clinically and is recommended as a routine practice. HbA 1C was not useful in screening for CF-related glucose intolerance.
 
dc.description.natureabstract
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pediatrics, 2003, v. 142 n. 2, p. 128-132 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2003.5
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2003.5
 
dc.identifier.epage132
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181144400013
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-3476
2012 Impact Factor: 4.035
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.202
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid12584532
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037326312
 
dc.identifier.spage128
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44380
 
dc.identifier.volume142
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpeds
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pediatrics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshCystic Fibrosis - complications - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
 
dc.subject.meshGlucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
 
dc.subject.meshHemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshMass Screening - methods
 
dc.titleGlucose intolerance in children with cystic fibrosis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Corey, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kalnins, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zielenski, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsui, LC</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto