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Article: In vivo measurements of ion transport in long-living CF mice
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TitleIn vivo measurements of ion transport in long-living CF mice
 
AuthorsWilschanski, MA2 3
Rozmahel, R2 3
Beharry, S3
Kent, G3
Li, C3
Tsui, LC2 3
Durie, P2 3
Bear, CE1 3
 
Issue Date1996
 
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622790/description
 
CitationBiochemical And Biophysical Research Communications, 1996, v. 219 n. 3, p. 753-759 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/bbrc.1996.0306
 
AbstractThe Cftr (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator) gene codes for an epithelial chloride (C1) channel essential for fluid secretion into the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract and from exocrine glands. Mice lacking CFTR function due to a disruption of Cftr exon 10 or exon 1 (Cftr(mlUNC/MlUNC) or Cftr(mlHSC/mlHSC) mice, respectively) generally suffer from severe gastrointestinal disease resulting in death shortly after birth or at the time of weaning. However, a subgroup of the Cftr(mlHSC/mlHSC) mice have been characterized which exhibit relatively mild intestinal pathology resulting in a noncompromised lifespan compared to the more severely affected Cftr(mlUNC/mlUNC) mice. We compared the ion transport capacity of the intestinal mucosa of the mildly and severely affected CF mice using the in vivo technique of rectal potential difference (PD) measurement and found that the net calcium-activated chloride conductance toward the lumen was much greater in the rectum of mildly affected mice than in the severely affected mice. Hence, the milder phenotype may be related to the expression of a factor which enhances the net calcium-activated chloride conductance into the lumen of the intestinal tract.
 
ISSN0006-291X
2013 Impact Factor: 2.281
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1006/bbrc.1996.0306
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:A1996TZ79900014
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWilschanski, MA
 
dc.contributor.authorRozmahel, R
 
dc.contributor.authorBeharry, S
 
dc.contributor.authorKent, G
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, C
 
dc.contributor.authorTsui, LC
 
dc.contributor.authorDurie, P
 
dc.contributor.authorBear, CE
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-12T03:50:56Z
 
dc.date.available2007-09-12T03:50:56Z
 
dc.date.issued1996
 
dc.description.abstractThe Cftr (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator) gene codes for an epithelial chloride (C1) channel essential for fluid secretion into the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract and from exocrine glands. Mice lacking CFTR function due to a disruption of Cftr exon 10 or exon 1 (Cftr(mlUNC/MlUNC) or Cftr(mlHSC/mlHSC) mice, respectively) generally suffer from severe gastrointestinal disease resulting in death shortly after birth or at the time of weaning. However, a subgroup of the Cftr(mlHSC/mlHSC) mice have been characterized which exhibit relatively mild intestinal pathology resulting in a noncompromised lifespan compared to the more severely affected Cftr(mlUNC/mlUNC) mice. We compared the ion transport capacity of the intestinal mucosa of the mildly and severely affected CF mice using the in vivo technique of rectal potential difference (PD) measurement and found that the net calcium-activated chloride conductance toward the lumen was much greater in the rectum of mildly affected mice than in the severely affected mice. Hence, the milder phenotype may be related to the expression of a factor which enhances the net calcium-activated chloride conductance into the lumen of the intestinal tract.
 
dc.description.natureabstract
 
dc.identifier.citationBiochemical And Biophysical Research Communications, 1996, v. 219 n. 3, p. 753-759 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/bbrc.1996.0306
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1006/bbrc.1996.0306
 
dc.identifier.epage759
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996TZ79900014
 
dc.identifier.issn0006-291X
2013 Impact Factor: 2.281
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid8645253
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029869364
 
dc.identifier.spage753
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44299
 
dc.identifier.volume219
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622790/description
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshChlorides - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshAmiloride - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshCystic fibrosis - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshCystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - genetics - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - physiology - physiopathology
 
dc.titleIn vivo measurements of ion transport in long-living CF mice
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine
  2. University of Toronto
  3. Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto