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Article: Assignment to human gamma crystallin multigene family to chromosome 2
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TitleAssignment to human gamma crystallin multigene family to chromosome 2
 
AuthorsWillard, HF1
Meakin, SO1 2
Tsui, LC1 2
Breitman, ML1 2
 
Issue Date1985
 
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0740-7750
 
CitationSomatic Cell And Molecular Genetics, 1985, v. 11 n. 5, p. 511-516 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01534846
 
AbstractThe multigene family for human γ-crystallin has been assigned to chromosome 2 using rodent-human somatic cell hybrids and filter hybridization analysis of cell hybrid DNA. Two genomic DNA probes containing human γ-crystallin gene sequences hybridize to five fragments in human DNA digested with the restriction enzyme EcoRI. By correlating the presence of these fragments in somatic cell hybrid DNA with the human chromosome content of the hybrids, at least six human γ-crystallin genes can be mapped to chromosome 2. Data obtained with a hybrid clone containing a mouse-human interspecies translocation suggest that these genes may be clustered together on the long arm of human chromosome 2.
 
ISSN0740-7750
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01534846
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:A1985ARK8400012
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWillard, HF
 
dc.contributor.authorMeakin, SO
 
dc.contributor.authorTsui, LC
 
dc.contributor.authorBreitman, ML
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-12T03:49:07Z
 
dc.date.available2007-09-12T03:49:07Z
 
dc.date.issued1985
 
dc.description.abstractThe multigene family for human γ-crystallin has been assigned to chromosome 2 using rodent-human somatic cell hybrids and filter hybridization analysis of cell hybrid DNA. Two genomic DNA probes containing human γ-crystallin gene sequences hybridize to five fragments in human DNA digested with the restriction enzyme EcoRI. By correlating the presence of these fragments in somatic cell hybrid DNA with the human chromosome content of the hybrids, at least six human γ-crystallin genes can be mapped to chromosome 2. Data obtained with a hybrid clone containing a mouse-human interspecies translocation suggest that these genes may be clustered together on the long arm of human chromosome 2.
 
dc.description.natureabstract
 
dc.identifier.citationSomatic Cell And Molecular Genetics, 1985, v. 11 n. 5, p. 511-516 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01534846
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01534846
 
dc.identifier.epage516
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1985ARK8400012
 
dc.identifier.issn0740-7750
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid2994242
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022409931
 
dc.identifier.spage511
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44212
 
dc.identifier.volume11
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0740-7750
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofSomatic Cell and Molecular Genetics
 
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
 
dc.subject.meshChromosome mapping
 
dc.subject.meshChromosomes, human, 1-3
 
dc.subject.meshCricetinae
 
dc.subject.meshCrystallins - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshDna restriction enzymes
 
dc.titleAssignment to human gamma crystallin multigene family to chromosome 2
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Meakin, SO</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsui, LC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Breitman, ML</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2007-09-12T03:49:07Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2007-09-12T03:49:07Z</date.available>
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<identifier.citation>Somatic Cell And Molecular Genetics, 1985, v. 11 n. 5, p. 511-516</identifier.citation>
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<description.abstract>The multigene family for human &#947;-crystallin has been assigned to chromosome 2 using rodent-human somatic cell hybrids and filter hybridization analysis of cell hybrid DNA. Two genomic DNA probes containing human &#947;-crystallin gene sequences hybridize to five fragments in human DNA digested with the restriction enzyme EcoRI. By correlating the presence of these fragments in somatic cell hybrid DNA with the human chromosome content of the hybrids, at least six human &#947;-crystallin genes can be mapped to chromosome 2. Data obtained with a hybrid clone containing a mouse-human interspecies translocation suggest that these genes may be clustered together on the long arm of human chromosome 2.</description.abstract>
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<subject.mesh>Chromosome mapping</subject.mesh>
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<subject.mesh>Cricetinae</subject.mesh>
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Toronto
  2. Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto