File Download

Conference Paper: Studying ICT supported pedagogical practices

TitleStudying ICT supported pedagogical practices
Authors
Issue Date2000
Citation
CITE Research Colloquium 2000: ICT (Information and Communication Technology) Supported Teaching and Learning, Hong Kong, China, 8-9 June 2000, pp. 11 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the past decade there has been an exponential growth in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and this has made pervasive impacts both on the society and on our daily lives. It is thus not surprising to find increasing interest, attention and investment put into the use of ICT in education all around the world. In addition to efforts to make use of ICT to improve learning, the emergence of the knowledge economy has also brought about in recent years a much greater emphasis on education and a number of masterplans in ICT in education has been produced in many countries. Such masterplans detailed not only strategies for implementation but more importantly embedded the plans within a broader framework of education reform that aimed to develop students’ capacities for self-learning, problem-solving, information seeking and analysis, critical thinking and the ability to communicate, collaborate and learn via the internet, abilities that figured much less importantly in the school curricula before. In this context, a new term, “emerging pedagogical practice”, was used in SITES (the Second International Information Technology in Education Study, conducted under the auspices of the IEA) (Pelgrum, 1999) to highlight the changing pedagogical goals and practices that has resulted from the use of ICT in education, as opposed to those uses that just aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of “traditionally important pedagogical practices”. However, the concept of “emerging pedagogical practice” as depicted in the SITES Module 1 (M1) report is still rather vague. When schools have access to computers and the Internet to support teaching and learning, how would teachers and students make use of them? What impact has ICT made on classroom practices? What changes, if any, has ICT made on the roles of teachers and students and the interactions between them? Has the introduction of ICT in schools brought about the desired education reforms envisaged in the ICT in education masterplans or are these wishful optimisms? Are there more effective models of ICT implementation in schools, and if so what are their characteristics? In conjunction with the SITES M1 Hong Kong study, we have conducted a study of good practices in the use of ICT for teaching and learning using the case studies approach. The main goal of this extension study was to explore the above questions in the context of good practices as commonly recognized by members of the education community, and to develop ways of disseminating such good practices. This paper describes the conceptual framework and methodology used in this study and reports briefly on some key findings from the study. The research methodology used in this Study is based on a model of pedagogical practice that is couched within a broad curriculum framework where the pedagogical practice is the implemented curriculum. There are two parts to the research. The first part is to investigate and to build models of pedagogical practices involving use of ICT. Here the assumption (substantiated by observations) is that the way ICT is incorporated into classrooms is very much dictated by the teachers’ general beliefs and approaches to education. The second component of the methodology deals with the models (strategies) of educational change used in different schools in introducing ICT across the curriculum and to explore if particular models of pedagogical practice is linked with specific school implementation strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44076

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, N-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, HK-
dc.contributor.authorKi, WW-
dc.contributor.authorLi, SSC-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChow, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-15T02:57:44Z-
dc.date.available2007-05-15T02:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.citationCITE Research Colloquium 2000: ICT (Information and Communication Technology) Supported Teaching and Learning, Hong Kong, China, 8-9 June 2000, pp. 11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44076-
dc.description.abstractDuring the past decade there has been an exponential growth in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and this has made pervasive impacts both on the society and on our daily lives. It is thus not surprising to find increasing interest, attention and investment put into the use of ICT in education all around the world. In addition to efforts to make use of ICT to improve learning, the emergence of the knowledge economy has also brought about in recent years a much greater emphasis on education and a number of masterplans in ICT in education has been produced in many countries. Such masterplans detailed not only strategies for implementation but more importantly embedded the plans within a broader framework of education reform that aimed to develop students’ capacities for self-learning, problem-solving, information seeking and analysis, critical thinking and the ability to communicate, collaborate and learn via the internet, abilities that figured much less importantly in the school curricula before. In this context, a new term, “emerging pedagogical practice”, was used in SITES (the Second International Information Technology in Education Study, conducted under the auspices of the IEA) (Pelgrum, 1999) to highlight the changing pedagogical goals and practices that has resulted from the use of ICT in education, as opposed to those uses that just aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of “traditionally important pedagogical practices”. However, the concept of “emerging pedagogical practice” as depicted in the SITES Module 1 (M1) report is still rather vague. When schools have access to computers and the Internet to support teaching and learning, how would teachers and students make use of them? What impact has ICT made on classroom practices? What changes, if any, has ICT made on the roles of teachers and students and the interactions between them? Has the introduction of ICT in schools brought about the desired education reforms envisaged in the ICT in education masterplans or are these wishful optimisms? Are there more effective models of ICT implementation in schools, and if so what are their characteristics? In conjunction with the SITES M1 Hong Kong study, we have conducted a study of good practices in the use of ICT for teaching and learning using the case studies approach. The main goal of this extension study was to explore the above questions in the context of good practices as commonly recognized by members of the education community, and to develop ways of disseminating such good practices. This paper describes the conceptual framework and methodology used in this study and reports briefly on some key findings from the study. The research methodology used in this Study is based on a model of pedagogical practice that is couched within a broad curriculum framework where the pedagogical practice is the implemented curriculum. There are two parts to the research. The first part is to investigate and to build models of pedagogical practices involving use of ICT. Here the assumption (substantiated by observations) is that the way ICT is incorporated into classrooms is very much dictated by the teachers’ general beliefs and approaches to education. The second component of the methodology deals with the models (strategies) of educational change used in different schools in introducing ICT across the curriculum and to explore if particular models of pedagogical practice is linked with specific school implementation strategies.en
dc.format.extent118256 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCITE Research Colloquium 2000-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleStudying ICT supported pedagogical practicesen
dc.typeConference_Paperen
dc.identifier.emailLaw, NWY: nlaw@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, HK: hkyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKi, WW: hraskww@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, SSC: scli@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, Y: yeunglee@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, NWY=rp00919-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, HK=rp00983-
dc.identifier.authorityKi, WW=rp00912-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros50729-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats