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Conference Paper: Scaffolding at the Inter-group Level: An International Collaboration Experience between Hong Kong and Canada Students

TitleScaffolding at the Inter-group Level: An International Collaboration Experience between Hong Kong and Canada Students
Authors
KeywordsScaffolding
International collaboration
Knowledge building
CSCL
Issue Date2006
Citation
CITE Research Symposium 2006, Hong Kong, China, 6-8 February 2006, p. 205-213 How to Cite?
AbstractThe concept of scaffolding suggests that with appropriate assistance, a learner could attain a goal or engage in a practice otherwise out of reach (Davis & Miyake, 2004). Previous studies have explored scaffolding between or among individuals (e.g., Wood, et al., 1976; Palincsar & Brown, 1984). This paper examined scaffolding that could happen at an inter-group level. A group of 22 Hong Kong primary five students collaborated with a group of 22 Canada grade five students through an online discussion forum. Although they were of the same grade, it was the first year for Hong Kong students to engage in online discussion activities, while Canada students were much experienced in this type of learning activities. As Pea (2004) argued that “fading”, which was the removal of supports to let learners act on their own, was as an essential component of scaffolding, this study incorporated a three-phase design so that fading could be studied in addition to the effect of scaffolding. In phase one, Hong Kong students discussed among themselves on the forum. In phase two, Canada students joined in the discussion with Hong Kong students. In phase three, Canada students were no longer present on the forum while Hong Kong students continued to discuss among themselves. To analyze the interaction patterns of the students, social network analysis was employed in the present study. It was found that in phase one, Hong Kong students tended to write isolated notes and work on their own topic; while in phase two, with the joining in of Canada students, the interaction pattern changed drastically, with the notes were linked with one another, even among those written by Hong Kong students. In phase three, although Canada students were no longer present on the discussion forum, the interaction pattern retained among Hong Kong students that their notes were linked with one another. The study suggested that with a more experienced group, the interaction pattern of a novice group in online discussion could be changed and the changed pattern could retain even the experienced group no longer present.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44058

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, M-
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-15-
dc.date.available2007-05-15-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationCITE Research Symposium 2006, Hong Kong, China, 6-8 February 2006, p. 205-213en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44058-
dc.description.abstractThe concept of scaffolding suggests that with appropriate assistance, a learner could attain a goal or engage in a practice otherwise out of reach (Davis & Miyake, 2004). Previous studies have explored scaffolding between or among individuals (e.g., Wood, et al., 1976; Palincsar & Brown, 1984). This paper examined scaffolding that could happen at an inter-group level. A group of 22 Hong Kong primary five students collaborated with a group of 22 Canada grade five students through an online discussion forum. Although they were of the same grade, it was the first year for Hong Kong students to engage in online discussion activities, while Canada students were much experienced in this type of learning activities. As Pea (2004) argued that “fading”, which was the removal of supports to let learners act on their own, was as an essential component of scaffolding, this study incorporated a three-phase design so that fading could be studied in addition to the effect of scaffolding. In phase one, Hong Kong students discussed among themselves on the forum. In phase two, Canada students joined in the discussion with Hong Kong students. In phase three, Canada students were no longer present on the forum while Hong Kong students continued to discuss among themselves. To analyze the interaction patterns of the students, social network analysis was employed in the present study. It was found that in phase one, Hong Kong students tended to write isolated notes and work on their own topic; while in phase two, with the joining in of Canada students, the interaction pattern changed drastically, with the notes were linked with one another, even among those written by Hong Kong students. In phase three, although Canada students were no longer present on the discussion forum, the interaction pattern retained among Hong Kong students that their notes were linked with one another. The study suggested that with a more experienced group, the interaction pattern of a novice group in online discussion could be changed and the changed pattern could retain even the experienced group no longer present.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCentre of Information Technology in Education, University of Hong Kong and Education and Manpower Bureau, the Government of the Hong Kong SARen
dc.format.extent77868 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageeng-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectScaffoldingen
dc.subjectInternational collaborationen
dc.subjectKnowledge buildingen
dc.subjectCSCLen
dc.titleScaffolding at the Inter-group Level: An International Collaboration Experience between Hong Kong and Canada Studentsen
dc.typeConference_Paperen
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK

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