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Book: Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China

TitleNarcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China
Authors
KeywordsDrug addiction - China - History
Opium abuse - China - History
Narcotics, control of - China - History
Issue Date2004
PublisherHong Kong University Press
Description'China was turned into a nation of opium addicts by the pernicious forces of imperialist trade.' This book systematically questions this assertion, showing that opium had few harmful effects on either health or longevity, that most smokers used it in moderate quantities without any fatal 'loss of control', and that it was prepared and appreciated in highly complex rituals with inbuilt constraints on excessive use. In a culture of restraint, opium was an ideal social lubricant helpful in maintaining decorum and composure. It was also a medical panacea before the availability of aspirin and penicillin. If opium was medicine as much as recreation, Narcotic Culture provides abundant evidence that the transition from a tolerated opium culture to a system of prohibition produced a cure which was far worse than the disease. Heroin and morphine were snorted, smoked, chewed or injected in the wake of the anti-opium movement, often in conditions far more harmful than opium smoking. Also discussed by the authors in this fascinating study are China's other drugs, from cocaine, nicotine, cannabis and synthetic opiates.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44021
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDikotter, F-
dc.contributor.authorLaamann, Lars-
dc.contributor.authorXun, Zhou-
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-14T01:32:29Z-
dc.date.available2007-05-14T01:32:29Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.isbn9789622097001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/44021-
dc.description'China was turned into a nation of opium addicts by the pernicious forces of imperialist trade.' This book systematically questions this assertion, showing that opium had few harmful effects on either health or longevity, that most smokers used it in moderate quantities without any fatal 'loss of control', and that it was prepared and appreciated in highly complex rituals with inbuilt constraints on excessive use. In a culture of restraint, opium was an ideal social lubricant helpful in maintaining decorum and composure. It was also a medical panacea before the availability of aspirin and penicillin. If opium was medicine as much as recreation, Narcotic Culture provides abundant evidence that the transition from a tolerated opium culture to a system of prohibition produced a cure which was far worse than the disease. Heroin and morphine were snorted, smoked, chewed or injected in the wake of the anti-opium movement, often in conditions far more harmful than opium smoking. Also discussed by the authors in this fascinating study are China's other drugs, from cocaine, nicotine, cannabis and synthetic opiates.en
dc.format.extent435 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.publisherHong Kong University Pressen
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectDrug addiction - China - Historyen
dc.subjectOpium abuse - China - Historyen
dc.subjectNarcotics, control of - China - Historyen
dc.titleNarcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in Chinaen
dc.typeBooken
dc.identifier.hkulb2697663-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK

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