File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Timing of birth and infant and early neonatal mortality in Sweden 1973-95: Longitudinal birth register study

TitleTiming of birth and infant and early neonatal mortality in Sweden 1973-95: Longitudinal birth register study
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bmj.com/
Citation
British Medical Journal, 2001, v. 323 n. 7325, p. 1327-1330 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To assess the impact of time of birth on infant mortality and early neonatal mortality in full term and preterm births. Design: Analysis of data from the Swedish birth register, 1973-95. Participants: 2 102 324 spontaneous live births of infants without congenital malformation. Outcome measurements: Absolute and relative risk of infant mortality, early neonatal mortality, and early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia. Results: Infant mortality, early neonatal mortality, and early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia were higher in infants who were born during the night (9 pm to 9 am) compared with those born during the day for 1973-9, 1980-9, and 1990-5. The difference was more dramatic for preterm infants. The largest difference was observed during 1990-5, when there was a 30% increase in early neonatal mortality (relative risk 1.31,95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.57) and a 70% increase in early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia (1.70, 1.22 to 2.38) in preterm infants born during the night compared with rates for preterm infants born during the day. A detailed analysis over 24 hours revealed two "high risk" periods: between 5 pm and 1 am and around 9 am. Conclusions: Infants born during the night have a greater risk of infant and early neonatal mortality and early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia than those born during the day. There has been no improvement over the past two decades. The problem is more serious for preterm births and was even worse in the 1990s. Shift changes and the hours immediately after such changes are high risk periods for neonatal care.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43618
ISSN
2008 Impact Factor: 12.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.567
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:50:32Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:50:32Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Medical Journal, 2001, v. 323 n. 7325, p. 1327-1330en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0959-8146en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43618-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess the impact of time of birth on infant mortality and early neonatal mortality in full term and preterm births. Design: Analysis of data from the Swedish birth register, 1973-95. Participants: 2 102 324 spontaneous live births of infants without congenital malformation. Outcome measurements: Absolute and relative risk of infant mortality, early neonatal mortality, and early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia. Results: Infant mortality, early neonatal mortality, and early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia were higher in infants who were born during the night (9 pm to 9 am) compared with those born during the day for 1973-9, 1980-9, and 1990-5. The difference was more dramatic for preterm infants. The largest difference was observed during 1990-5, when there was a 30% increase in early neonatal mortality (relative risk 1.31,95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.57) and a 70% increase in early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia (1.70, 1.22 to 2.38) in preterm infants born during the night compared with rates for preterm infants born during the day. A detailed analysis over 24 hours revealed two "high risk" periods: between 5 pm and 1 am and around 9 am. Conclusions: Infants born during the night have a greater risk of infant and early neonatal mortality and early neonatal mortality related to asphyxia than those born during the day. There has been no improvement over the past two decades. The problem is more serious for preterm births and was even worse in the 1990s. Shift changes and the hours immediately after such changes are high risk periods for neonatal care.en_HK
dc.format.extent403723 bytes-
dc.format.extent27648 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bmj.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsB M J. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshLabor, obstetricen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsphyxia neonatorum - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshSweden - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_HK
dc.titleTiming of birth and infant and early neonatal mortality in Sweden 1973-95: Longitudinal birth register studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0959-535X&volume=323&issue=7325&spage=1327&epage=1330&date=2001&atitle=Timing+of+birth+and+infant+and+early+neonatal+mortality+in+Sweden+1973-95:+longitudinal+birth+register+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.323.7325.1327en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11739216-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC60669-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035830057en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros67342-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035830057&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume323en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7325en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1327en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1330en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000172716900013-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, ZC=7401699005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7509939-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats