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Article: The impact of community psychological responses on outbreak control for severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong

TitleThe impact of community psychological responses on outbreak control for severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2003, v. 57 n. 11, p. 857-863 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine the public's knowledge and perception of SARS and the extent to which various precautionary measures have been adopted. Design: Cross sectional survey. Setting: General population of Hong Kong at the height of the SARS outbreak (29 March to 6 April 2003). Participants: 1115 ethnic Chinese adults. Main results: Forty per cent did not recognise fomites as a possible mode of transmission whereas 55.1% believed that the infection could be transmitted airborne. A large proportion (30.1%) believed they were very or somewhat likely to contract SARS while only one quarter believed they were very likely to survive if they contracted the disease, benchmarked against an actual case fatality ratio of 2.8% at the time of the survey and 15%-20% according to current best estimates. Precautionary measures directed against person to person droplet spread were generally adopted by most while the prevention of transmission through fomites was not practised as frequently. Respondents with higher risk perceptions and a moderate level of anxiety were most likely to take comprehensive precautionary measures against the infection, as were older, female, more educated people as well as those with a positive contact history and SARS-like symptoms. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that the promotion of protective personal health practices to interrupt the self sustaining transmission of the SARS virus in the community must take into account background perceptions of risk and anxiety levels of the public at large. Continuing public education about preventive measures should be targeted at the identified groups with low current uptake of precautions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43583
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, BHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, IOLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:49:34Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:49:34Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2003, v. 57 n. 11, p. 857-863en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43583-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the public's knowledge and perception of SARS and the extent to which various precautionary measures have been adopted. Design: Cross sectional survey. Setting: General population of Hong Kong at the height of the SARS outbreak (29 March to 6 April 2003). Participants: 1115 ethnic Chinese adults. Main results: Forty per cent did not recognise fomites as a possible mode of transmission whereas 55.1% believed that the infection could be transmitted airborne. A large proportion (30.1%) believed they were very or somewhat likely to contract SARS while only one quarter believed they were very likely to survive if they contracted the disease, benchmarked against an actual case fatality ratio of 2.8% at the time of the survey and 15%-20% according to current best estimates. Precautionary measures directed against person to person droplet spread were generally adopted by most while the prevention of transmission through fomites was not practised as frequently. Respondents with higher risk perceptions and a moderate level of anxiety were most likely to take comprehensive precautionary measures against the infection, as were older, female, more educated people as well as those with a positive contact history and SARS-like symptoms. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that the promotion of protective personal health practices to interrupt the self sustaining transmission of the SARS virus in the community must take into account background perceptions of risk and anxiety levels of the public at large. Continuing public education about preventive measures should be targeted at the identified groups with low current uptake of precautions.en_HK
dc.format.extent398453 bytes-
dc.format.extent25600 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.subject.meshCommunicable diseases, emerging - prevention & control - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere acute respiratory syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshCommunity health services - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease outbreaks - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.titleThe impact of community psychological responses on outbreak control for severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0143-005X&volume=57&issue=11&spage=857&epage=863&date=2003&atitle=The+impact+of+community+psychological+responses+on+outbreak+control+for+severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, IOL: iolwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IOL=rp01806en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.57.11.857en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14600110-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1732323-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0242404372en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros85179-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0242404372&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage857en_HK
dc.identifier.epage863en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186343800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BHY=7201530732en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, IOL=7102513940en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK

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