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Article: Byssinosis in Guangzhou, China
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TitleByssinosis in Guangzhou, China
 
AuthorsJiang, CQ1
Lam, TH1
Kong, C1
Cui, CA1
Huang, HK1
Chen, DC1
He, JM1
Xian, PZ1
Chen, YH1
 
Keywordsbyssinosis
cotton dust
 
Issue Date1995
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.occenvmed.com
 
CitationOccupational And Environmental Medicine, 1995, v. 52 n. 4, p. 268-272 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractObjectives - To study the prevalence of byssinosis and other respiratory abnormalities in workers exposed to cotton dust in Guangzhou in two factories that processed purely cotton. Methods - All the 1320 workers exposed were included. The controls were 1306 workers with no history of occupational dust exposure. Total dust and inhalable dust were measured by Chinese total dust sampler and American vertical elutriator respectively. A World Health Organisation questionnaire was used. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1) were measured by a Vitalograph spirometer. Results - The median inhalable dust concentrations ranged from 0.41 to 1.51 mg/m 3 and median total dust concentrations from 3.04 to 12.32 mg/m. The prevalence of respiratory abnormalities in the cotton workers were (a) typical Monday symptoms 9.0%; (b) FEV 1 fall by ≥ 5% after a shift 16.8%; (c) FEV 1 fall by ≥ 10% after a shift 4.2%; (d) FEV'q < 80% predicted 6.1%; (e) FEV 1/FVC < 75% 4.0%; (f) cough or phlegm 18.2%; (g) chronic bronchitis 10-9%; and (h) byssinosis, defined by (a) plus (b) 1.7%. With the exception of (d), most of the prevalences increased with increasing age, duration of exposure, and cumulative inhalable dust exposure. No increasing trends of respiratory abnormalities were found for current total dust, inhalable dust, and cumulative total dust concentrations. Compared with controls, after adjustment for sex and smoking, with the exception of (d), all the pooled relative risks of respiratory abnormalities were raised for cotton exposure. Conclusions - It is concluded that cumulative inhalable cotton is likely to be the cause of byssinotic symptoms, acute lung function decrements, cough, or phlegm, and chronic bronchitis.
 
ISSN1351-0711
2013 Impact Factor: 3.234
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1128206
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:A1995QT35000009
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorKong, C
 
dc.contributor.authorCui, CA
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, HK
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, DC
 
dc.contributor.authorHe, JM
 
dc.contributor.authorXian, PZ
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, YH
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:49:03Z
 
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:49:03Z
 
dc.date.issued1995
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives - To study the prevalence of byssinosis and other respiratory abnormalities in workers exposed to cotton dust in Guangzhou in two factories that processed purely cotton. Methods - All the 1320 workers exposed were included. The controls were 1306 workers with no history of occupational dust exposure. Total dust and inhalable dust were measured by Chinese total dust sampler and American vertical elutriator respectively. A World Health Organisation questionnaire was used. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1) were measured by a Vitalograph spirometer. Results - The median inhalable dust concentrations ranged from 0.41 to 1.51 mg/m 3 and median total dust concentrations from 3.04 to 12.32 mg/m. The prevalence of respiratory abnormalities in the cotton workers were (a) typical Monday symptoms 9.0%; (b) FEV 1 fall by ≥ 5% after a shift 16.8%; (c) FEV 1 fall by ≥ 10% after a shift 4.2%; (d) FEV'q < 80% predicted 6.1%; (e) FEV 1/FVC < 75% 4.0%; (f) cough or phlegm 18.2%; (g) chronic bronchitis 10-9%; and (h) byssinosis, defined by (a) plus (b) 1.7%. With the exception of (d), most of the prevalences increased with increasing age, duration of exposure, and cumulative inhalable dust exposure. No increasing trends of respiratory abnormalities were found for current total dust, inhalable dust, and cumulative total dust concentrations. Compared with controls, after adjustment for sex and smoking, with the exception of (d), all the pooled relative risks of respiratory abnormalities were raised for cotton exposure. Conclusions - It is concluded that cumulative inhalable cotton is likely to be the cause of byssinotic symptoms, acute lung function decrements, cough, or phlegm, and chronic bronchitis.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent430569 bytes
 
dc.format.extent2360 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
 
dc.identifier.citationOccupational And Environmental Medicine, 1995, v. 52 n. 4, p. 268-272 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage272
 
dc.identifier.hkuros1350
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QT35000009
 
dc.identifier.issn1351-0711
2013 Impact Factor: 3.234
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1128206
 
dc.identifier.pmid7795743
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028950971
 
dc.identifier.spage268
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43560
 
dc.identifier.volume52
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.occenvmed.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofOccupational and Environmental Medicine
 
dc.rightsOccupational and Environmental Medicine. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshByssinosis - epidemiology - etiology
 
dc.subject.meshDust - adverse effects - analysis
 
dc.subject.meshGossypium
 
dc.subject.meshOccupational exposure
 
dc.subject.meshRespiration disorders - epidemiology - etiology
 
dc.subjectbyssinosis
 
dc.subjectcotton dust
 
dc.titleByssinosis in Guangzhou, China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Huang, HK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, DC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>He, JM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Xian, PZ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, YH</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. GODPTC