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Article: The Impact of Electronic Commerce on Procurement

TitleThe Impact of Electronic Commerce on Procurement
Authors
KeywordsElectronic commerce
Impact study
Migration process
Procurement
Supply chain management
SWOT
Issue Date2003
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.leaonline.com/loi/joce
Citation
Journal Of Organizational Computing And Electronic Commerce, 2003, v. 13 n. 3-4, p. 167-189 How to Cite?
AbstractInternet technology has been increasingly used to enhance the global competitiveness of various business applications through the widespread electronic commerce (EC) functions. Many Internet-based systems have been designed and developed for supply chain management (SCM) in various areas such as computer, garment, and publishing industries, which mainly center on communication infrastructure, coordination between production and distribution, and procurement functions with security mechanisms. However, EC is not a panacea. On many occasions, participants (including buyers, sellers, and enablers) face various risks and overhead during the deployment of a new technology. In this article, we present the impact of EC on procurement processes in supply chains, highlighting the issues of buyers, sellers, and the transaction processes involved. The procurement processes are classified into preprocurement (sourcing), procurement (quotation, negotiation, order placement, and transaction), and postprocurement (delivery). Moreover, a four-phase migration model of procurement onto the Internet is introduced to illustrate the technical, security, and financial requirements in the deployment process of EC. The migration model not only gives a development guideline of procurement functions, but also provides an evaluation framework of e-procurement. An industrial example is used to illustrate the corresponding evolution as a result of EC deployment. The paper concludes with a summary of EC impact and future research directions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43545
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.944
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.440
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYen, BPCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, EOSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:48:33Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:48:33Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Organizational Computing And Electronic Commerce, 2003, v. 13 n. 3-4, p. 167-189en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1091-9392en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43545-
dc.description.abstractInternet technology has been increasingly used to enhance the global competitiveness of various business applications through the widespread electronic commerce (EC) functions. Many Internet-based systems have been designed and developed for supply chain management (SCM) in various areas such as computer, garment, and publishing industries, which mainly center on communication infrastructure, coordination between production and distribution, and procurement functions with security mechanisms. However, EC is not a panacea. On many occasions, participants (including buyers, sellers, and enablers) face various risks and overhead during the deployment of a new technology. In this article, we present the impact of EC on procurement processes in supply chains, highlighting the issues of buyers, sellers, and the transaction processes involved. The procurement processes are classified into preprocurement (sourcing), procurement (quotation, negotiation, order placement, and transaction), and postprocurement (delivery). Moreover, a four-phase migration model of procurement onto the Internet is introduced to illustrate the technical, security, and financial requirements in the deployment process of EC. The migration model not only gives a development guideline of procurement functions, but also provides an evaluation framework of e-procurement. An industrial example is used to illustrate the corresponding evolution as a result of EC deployment. The paper concludes with a summary of EC impact and future research directions.en_HK
dc.format.extent611872 bytes-
dc.format.extent25600 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.leaonline.com/loi/joceen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerceen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectElectronic commerceen_HK
dc.subjectImpact studyen_HK
dc.subjectMigration processen_HK
dc.subjectProcurementen_HK
dc.subjectSupply chain managementen_HK
dc.subjectSWOTen_HK
dc.titleThe Impact of Electronic Commerce on Procurementen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1091-9392&volume=13&issue=3&4&spage=167&epage=189&date=2003&atitle=The+Impact+of+Electronic+Commerce+on+Procurementen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYen, BPC: benyen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYen, BPC=rp01121en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/S15327744JOCE133&4_02en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0042379930en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros94786-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0042379930&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage167en_HK
dc.identifier.epage189en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000184991600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYen, BPC=7102564239en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EOS=8142898000en_HK

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