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Article: Gender and conversational dominance in Japanese conversation

TitleGender and conversational dominance in Japanese conversation
Authors
KeywordsConversational dominance
Conversational orientation
Conversational style
Gender
Japanese conversation
Issue Date2004
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LSY
Citation
Language In Society, 2004, v. 33 n. 2, p. 223-248 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of studies have been conducted on "dominance" as reflected in spoken interactional features, most of which deal with English. Many of these studies adopt a quantitative approach, examining the amount and distribution of interactional features such as amount of talk, interruptions and overlaps, turn-taking, questions, and topic initiations, and they have drawn conclusions on "dominance" accordingly. The present study explores gender dominance in conversation by analyzing conversational data from eight Japanese dyads by integrating quantitative and qualitative analyses. The quantitative analysis of two dimensions of conversational dominance, sequential dominance and participatory dominance, does not show any obvious gender dominance; however, the qualitative analysis of three of the dyads finds a clear pattern of male speakers' self-oriented conversational style, which is manifested in their storytelling and claiming expertise, and this is supported by female speakers' other-oriented conversational style. Gender dominance therefore is seen as a mutual construction. The conclusion discusses the importance of integrating findings from both quantitative and qualitative analyses in situated contexts to deepen understanding of the complexity of gender dominance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43530
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.525
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.034
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorItakura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsui, ABMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:48:06Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:48:06Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLanguage In Society, 2004, v. 33 n. 2, p. 223-248en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0047-4045en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43530-
dc.description.abstractA number of studies have been conducted on "dominance" as reflected in spoken interactional features, most of which deal with English. Many of these studies adopt a quantitative approach, examining the amount and distribution of interactional features such as amount of talk, interruptions and overlaps, turn-taking, questions, and topic initiations, and they have drawn conclusions on "dominance" accordingly. The present study explores gender dominance in conversation by analyzing conversational data from eight Japanese dyads by integrating quantitative and qualitative analyses. The quantitative analysis of two dimensions of conversational dominance, sequential dominance and participatory dominance, does not show any obvious gender dominance; however, the qualitative analysis of three of the dyads finds a clear pattern of male speakers' self-oriented conversational style, which is manifested in their storytelling and claiming expertise, and this is supported by female speakers' other-oriented conversational style. Gender dominance therefore is seen as a mutual construction. The conclusion discusses the importance of integrating findings from both quantitative and qualitative analyses in situated contexts to deepen understanding of the complexity of gender dominance.en_HK
dc.format.extent93363 bytes-
dc.format.extent25600 bytes-
dc.format.extent158022 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LSYen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage in Societyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsLanguage in Society. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectConversational dominanceen_HK
dc.subjectConversational orientationen_HK
dc.subjectConversational styleen_HK
dc.subjectGenderen_HK
dc.subjectJapanese conversationen_HK
dc.titleGender and conversational dominance in Japanese conversationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0047-4045&volume=33&issue=2&spage=223&epage=248&date=2004&atitle=Gender+and+conversational+dominance+in+Japanese+conversationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsui, ABM: bmtsui@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsui, ABM=rp00062en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0047404504332033en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2142768435en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros89649-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2142768435&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage223en_HK
dc.identifier.epage248en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220503800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridItakura, H=35958666900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsui, ABM=7006812714en_HK

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