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Article: Thinking Styles: their relationships with modes of thinking and academic performance

TitleThinking Styles: their relationships with modes of thinking and academic performance
Authors
KeywordsEducation
Issue Date2002
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01443410.asp
Citation
Educational Psychology, 2002, v. 22 n. 3, p. 331-348 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study aimed at investigating the nature of thinking styles as described in the theory of mental self-government. Two-hundred-and-twelve US university students responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory and the Styles of Learning and Thinking. Results from convergent statistical analysis procedures indicated that thinking styles and modes of thinking share certain common variance in the data. It was evident that the more creativity-generating and more complex thinking styles are significantly related to a holistic mode of thinking, and that the more norm-conforming and more simplistic thinking styles are significantly related to an analytic mode of thinking. Furthermore, multiple-regression analyses showed that both thinking styles and modes of thinking statistically contributed to students' self-reported grade point averages beyond what was explained by their self-rated ability scores. These findings are discussed in terms of practical implications for educators.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43528

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:48:03Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEducational Psychology, 2002, v. 22 n. 3, p. 331-348en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43528-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed at investigating the nature of thinking styles as described in the theory of mental self-government. Two-hundred-and-twelve US university students responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory and the Styles of Learning and Thinking. Results from convergent statistical analysis procedures indicated that thinking styles and modes of thinking share certain common variance in the data. It was evident that the more creativity-generating and more complex thinking styles are significantly related to a holistic mode of thinking, and that the more norm-conforming and more simplistic thinking styles are significantly related to an analytic mode of thinking. Furthermore, multiple-regression analyses showed that both thinking styles and modes of thinking statistically contributed to students' self-reported grade point averages beyond what was explained by their self-rated ability scores. These findings are discussed in terms of practical implications for educators.en_HK
dc.format.extent198668 bytes-
dc.format.extent26112 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01443410.aspen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectEducationen_HK
dc.titleThinking Styles: their relationships with modes of thinking and academic performanceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01443410220138557en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros79119-

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